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CNN
Jun 28, 2013 1:00pm PDT
diamond and martin savidge outside the courtroom? sanford, florida. we'rie going to continue keep a eye on the courtroom. was it a strategy by the state to put a witness on the stand who bolsters the defense's argument? >> well, i don't think that they wanted that to happen but i think that's what did happen. look, when you're in a courtroom, you kind of know what the other side is going to do, so i'm sure the prosecutor knew if i don't call john good, they're going to call john good so i might as well do it myself and get out in front of it. the problem is whether you compare john good to other witnesses that we've heard this week, this is the end of the first week, the girl friend rachel, for example, compare their demeanor and it's all about who the jury believes and who they think is trustworthy. when i watched john good testify today, he wasn't on either side. he wasn't on trayvon martin's side and he wasn't on george zimmerman's side but what he said i thought was much more compelling for the defense case, even though he was a prosecution witness. >> interesting. john good wor
CNN
Jul 3, 2013 1:00am PDT
. along with a top foreencic scientist. but first, martin savidge sets the stage. >> reporter: prosecutors switched from using george zimmerman's friends against him to using his injuries. >> the injuries to the defendant's back of the head consistent with repeatedly being slammed into a concrete surface. >> no. >> reporter: a medical examiner testified that zimmerman's wounds were not life threatening. the key reason zimmerman is given for shooting trayvon martin. >> how would you classify the injuries to the defendant's head? >> they were not life threatening. they were very insignificant. they did not require any sutures to be applied to mr. zimmerman. so i would refer to them insignificant injuries. >> reporter: on cross-examination, the defense attorney mark o'mara implied valerie rao owed her job to the special prosecutor in the zimmerman case. and then walked her back from some of her findings. >> it's your position that it's consistent that george zimmerman may have only received as little as three -- did you call -- what term did you -- smasher? >> sorry? >> slamming.
CNN
Jul 1, 2013 9:00pm PDT
, none of this would have happened either. >> martin savidge, thank you very much. >>> trayvon martin's parents were in the courtroom today, listening to george zimmerman's description of the last moments of their son's life. natalie, welcome back to the show. >> thank you for having me, piers. >> the general feeling seems to be, it was a good day for the defense, because the police effectively corroborated much of what george zimmerman had told them, and basically said they agreed with him, there is another view that there were certain parts of what came out today, which were very helpful to the prosecution, i want you to highlight those for me, if you can. >> there were. first i'd like to put the statement that it was a good day for the defense. and -- the defense -- detective was asked at each point that he interviewed george zimmerman, did he change his story? he wasn't asked when he looked at all his interviews together, he said he did not have a chance to do that until later. let's talk about some of the inconsistencies. one is that george zimmerman said trayvon circled h
CNN
Jul 1, 2013 8:00pm PDT
panel is going to weigh-in on who had a better day in court. first cnn's martin savidge wraps up the day's testimony. >> reporter: doris singleton was the first to interview zimmerman the night he shot trayvon martin, and said he seemed surprised to learn the teen had died. >> yes, at some point, i had said that we weren't able to identify the victim. and he said, well, what do you mean you haven't been able to identify him? >> i said, we don't know who he is. and he said, he's dead? and i said, i thought you knew that. i thought you knew he was dead. and he kind of slung his head and shook it. >> in a recording of that interview, zimmerman again repeats the line prosecutors say went to his state of mind. >> there were a few times where i've seen a suspicious person in the neighborhood. we call the police, the nonemergency line, and these guys always get away. >> the state contends zimmerman instantly profiled martin that night. pointing to his written statement, in which zimmerman repeatedly described martin as the suspect. and prosecutors attempted to show how zimmerman's account c
CNN
Jul 3, 2013 6:00pm PDT
should take the stand. >>> beginning with martin savidge outside the court live in sanford, florida. martin, another day, another gripping day of what could be vital testimony, the gun, the dna and so on. tell me about what happened today. >> yeah, a lot of forensics, piers. experts and evidence. much of the afternoon talking about dna, specifically whose dna was found where or not found. and the focus became upon the gun. the gun that george zimmerman used to shoot 17-year-old trayvon martin. zimmerman said at one point trayvon was reaching for his gun and my have got a hand on it. so what did the dna testing find? take a listen. >> the dna you got from the pistol grip of the defendant's gun is positive for gooblood, correct? >> yes. >> and the major matched the defendant, george zimmerman? >> yes. >> and you were able to exclude trayvon martin as having dna on the pistol grip, is that correct? >> yes, trayvon martin was excluded as being a possible contributor to this mixture on the grip. >> simply put, it means trayvon martin's dna was not found on that gun, and that could, of co
CNN
Jul 3, 2013 9:00pm PDT
who defended o.j. simpson in his murder trial. i want to begin with cnn's martin savidge, live for us in sanford, florida. martin, another day, another gripping series of witnesses, t happened today. >> a lot of forensics, piers. experts and evidence. much of the afternoon talking about dna, specifically whose dna was found where or not found. and the focus became on the gun. the gun that george zimmerman used to shoot 17-year-old trayvon martin. george zimmerman said at one point trayvon was, he believed, reaching for his gun and may have got a hand on it. what did the dna testing find? take a listen. >> the dna that you developed in the pistol grip of the defendant's gun is positive for blood, correct? >> yes. >> and then there was a mixture. that matched the defendant george zimmerman and you were able toex cloud trayvon martin martin as having dna on the pistol grip, is that correct? >> yes, trayvon martin was excluded as possible contributor to the mixture on the grip. >> simply put it, it means trayvon martin's dna was not found on the gun and that could of course hurt the de
CNN
Jul 1, 2013 6:00pm PDT
him? >> we go straight to martin savidge with all the information from the george zimmerman trial. we heard everything coming straight out of george zimmerman's mouth, in what was almost realtime interviews. >> it was. yeah, it was a pretty fascinating day. we got to hear from an audio expert. we got to hear from george zimmerman himself. he never took the stand. >> for the first time, jurors hear george zimmerman's version, what happened the night trayvon martin died, in a tanked police interview. >> i was walking back through to where my car was, and he jumped out from the bushes. and he said what the [ bleep ] is your problem? he just started punching me in the face. and i started screaming for help. i couldn't see, i couldn't breathe. i thought he was going for my firearm. i grabbed it immediately, as he banged my head again, i pulled out my firearm and shot him. >> another dramatic moment, dora singleton's testimony when he learned martin was dead. >> he said, he's dead? and i said, i thought you knew that. i thought you knew he was dead. and he kind of swung his head and just sh
CNN
Jun 28, 2013 6:00pm PDT
-all very much indeed. >>> coming up a look ahead to monday's testimony. martin savidge is live in florida. who will take the stand, coming up. 'one size fits all'. it doesn't. that's crazy. we're all totally different. ishares core. etf building blocks for your personalized portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. [ male announcer ] introducing red lobster's seaside mix & match. combine any two from a wide variety of seven excitin
CNN
Jun 30, 2013 11:00am PDT
george zimmerman murder trial. cnn's martin savidge is in sanford. prosecutors say they will use zimmerman's own words to prove he murdered trayvon martin. explain that for us. >> that will be very interesting to watch. they have not told us everything as to how this case is going do move forward, the prosecution, i'm talking about. what we take from that statement is there were a number of statements that george zimmerman gave to authorities and one of them includes that reenactment which was done the very next day. that's on videotape. then there were a number of interrogation sessions the sanford police did with george zimmerman over a series of days. what they have found and this is already known, there's some discrepancies. the way he tells the story one time is not exactly how he tells the story the next time. there are problems with the timeline and problems with where he actually was and some of the description he gives. that's why authorities say they hope they will be able to demonstrate, prove that he has real problems with this self-defense argument he has put forward
CNN
Jun 28, 2013 9:00pm PDT
not the only key witness taking the stand today. here is martin savidge with highlights. >> reporter: what jonathan good saw the night trayvon martin died goes to the heart of the zimmerman case. >> that night that you saw, the person you know to be trayvon martin was on top, correct? >> correct. >> and he was raining blows on the person on the bottom, george zimmerman, right? >> that's what it looked like. >> reporter: he was watching from his patio about 15 to 20 feet away. zimmerman that night was wearing a red and blackjack et, martin a dark hooded sweatshirt. >> the color of clothing on top, what could you see? >> it was dark. >> okay. how about the color of clothing on the bottom. >> i believe it was white or red color. >> reporter: that's not all good says she saw. he witnessed physical blows being thrown and mix the marshall arts. >> what you saw was the person on top in an mma style straddle position, correct? >> correct. >> that was further described, was it not, as being ground and pound? >> correct. >> reporter: good also testified about one more key question, that voice
CNN
Jun 27, 2013 12:00am PDT
>>> hey, that's it for us. we'll see you an hour from now at 10:00 p.m. eastern for self-defense and the zimmermann trial. thanks for watching. piers morgan starts now. >>> tears, racial slumps and language we can't repeat. the witness takes the stand in the trial and a -- >> i asked him what the man looked like. he looked like a creepy [ bleep ] cracker. >> and a former nfl star in court in handcuffs charged with murdering a friend. we break it down in law and disorder and the supreme court makes history. bush versus gore and made the case against prop eight. >>> and stephanie and newt gingrich on the right. it can only mean one thing, cross fire is back on cnn. look at them all ready to cross fire. wow. what an imposing panel you-all look tonight. very exciting. >>> tonight taking on edward snowden, marriage and texas' 500th execution. >>> an explosive day of testimony from a star witness in the george zimmerman trial. rachel was witness number eight. she was on the phone with martin moments before he was shot and killed by zimmerman and that testimony was must see from everything from tears talking about martin's death to some language we can't repeat here. martin savidge has the latest. a dramatic day in court today. >> reporter: an incredible day. this was a witness everyone had been waiting to see, highly anticipated is not leveling enough. this young lady as you pointed out, was on the phone with martin at the time he crossed paths with zimmerman. it's the critical moment and she has the answers, at least from the state's perspective, as to what really went on. a number of things she brought out and this is all for the prosecution. she says on the phone with trayvon, trayvon says i'm being followed. this is at the time george zimmerman identified trayvon martin in the neighborhood. then later she says she can hear over the telephone someone confronting trayvon martin, and she says it's george zimmerman. so already, we're seeing a change here. and then on top of that later, she hears trayvon saying get off, get off, well, that would imply that george zimmerman is now the aggressor and on top or at least trying to get on top of the young teenager. so, this would all fly directly in the face of self-defense that george zimmerman has been proclaiming. however, this young witness has a lot of credibility issues, and that's of course, what the defense was going after saying her testimony changed over time and she has admitted to lying in this case. piers? >> she also, martin, had a kind of strange demeanor, i thought in court. the sort of thing you haven't seen for a long time, irritated in parts, very annoyed at some of the questioning. didn't want to come back. how will that play for the prosecution given that she's such a crucial witness? >> a lot of people were looking at it going oh, boy, this is a train wreck but looking at it in a different perspective than jurors. jurors could look at her attitude. she clearly was not wanting to be there. she said she didn't want to be there. it upset her in a number of ways. she was the last person that talked to him, but i think she also comes across as somewhat credible because of that fact. in other words, she doesn't have anything to lose, and she did seem to have a certain sincerity, if you could read it through the attitude and that's the real question only the jurors know. i tried to watch faces. i know people in there and looking at them. there was never a time the jurors got emotional but trayvon martin's family got emotional at times over what she had to say. >> thank you very much indeed. we'll talk about about this case. >>> joining me to break down what happened gloria and we also have james and cnn senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin. welcome to you-all. i wasn't quite sure who was coming. there you-all are and looking very star full, i must say. >> jeffrey, your reaction what happened today and this key witness because it's hard to work out after that performance whether she was brilliant for the prosecution, or potentially not so brilliant. what do you think? >> you know, she was an unusual difficult witness to evaluate because she was like a kid up there. she answered in half sentences. it was very hard to hear or understand a lot of what she said. she admitted that she had lied under oath in the past. she very much seemed sympathetic to the martin family and to the prosecution, so all of that could on the one hand make her seem like a terrible witness but on the other hand she just seemed like a kid who was telling the truth in certain respects, at least the crucial aspects, trayvon was on the phone saying this guy is following me and making me uncomfortable. that's the key part of her testimony, and that seemed believable to me, anyway. >> well, let's take a look at that particular clip of what she said about the sequence of events. let's watch that first. >> i asked him how the man looked like. he looked like a creepy [ bleep ] cracker and then i just told him run. then he said why are you following me for? and i heard a hard breath man come say what you doing around here? and i start hearing grass and grass -- wet grass sound. i kept on going trayvon, trayvon, and i heard a little bit trayvon saying get off, get off and suddenly the phone hung up. >> jay, i mean, if you take that at face value and that is the truth, that's a brett at the devastating indictment of what george zimmerman did, isn't it? >> it is and isn't, piers. the only issue here is self-defense. it was what was in george zimmerman's mind at the confrontation. it's not about this young lady's credibility because it's a wash what her testimony is. yes, she was a difficult witness. she was impossible. she also said things like she heard the wet grass movement. really? what does that sound like? the reality is she's rolling her eyes. she's talking to trayvon and saying he's running hard, he's breathing and scared and she is doing her hair on the blue tooth. to me, i discount it because if it was that horrible she would have taken the blue tooth off and listened and called somebody but she didn't. that doesn't go to who confronted who first. trayvon was very angry. he's annoyed this guy is watching him and looking at him so maybe, just maybe he's the one that started the confrontation because for self-defense, what's in the mind of george zimmerman did he have a reasonable fear of great bodily harm or death at that moment. >> let me play a second clip, this is for gloria to commit on afterwards. this is an interesting point she made which i think will resinate with the jurors. >> do you watch first 48? >> i didn't hear you. >> do you watch first 48? they call them the first number that the victim talked to. >> i'm sorry, the first 4? >> a show, the first 48, when a victim died, they call the number that the victim called before, and they have it. they didn't call my number, so -- and they had already got the person so case closed, i thought. >> now gloria, i thought this was a really fascinating part of today's testimony. because what she's saying is look, i watched this tv show and it's about cops and investigators and so on, and in this kind of situation, they would always get the phone that trayvon martin's cell phone and see who he had been talking to in his last few minutes and interview that person. the police didn't do that. she called out everybody, the police, the investigators, everybody, is that significant? >> i think it is interesting that young people often learn about the criminal justice system from television, as opposed to in school. so what she was saying is i watch this television program. the police are supported to call me, i'm not supported to call the police, and they didn't call me and that's why i didn't go to law enforcement. >> why didn't they call her? >> why didn't they call her? i don't know because they should have called as soon as possible to get her testimony, to get her statement for the police and to get it before mr. crump was able to record her, which he did -- >> trayvon's attorney. >> yes, trayvon's attorney and now she's having to defend what she said to mr. crump, which apparently was played on television, she said she didn't know it would be. now she's saying she didn't take that seriously. what she said and she has to defend a lot of inconsistencies and also lies she told and yet she was honest about the lies she told. she explained and gave a reason at least why she lied to the victim's mother about not going to trayvon's funeral. she's under pressure. she doesn't want to be there. she didn't want to be involved in all this. she was obviously upset that trayvon was died -- or was killed and she really didn't want to be a part of it, but she went along with it and talked to mr. crump along with the victim's mother. >> jeffrey toobin, this is where she gets challenged why she was inconsistent in some previous evidence. see what she said about this. >> you have to understand what i'm trying to tell you. i'm the last person, you don't know what -- how i felt. you think i really want to go see the body after i just talked to him? >> there was also, jeffrey, before you respond to that, i want to play the final clip of that, when she was made aware that she may have to come back. watch this. >> maybe we can break until the morning -- >> no, i'm -- >> what? >> i'm leaving today, no. >> are you refusing to come back tomorrow? >> to you? >> how much more time do you think that you need to finish your cross? >> i certainly wouldn't -- i don't know for sure. i would think we should plan on at least a couple of hours. >> what? >> i agree with you jeffrey, there may be inconsistencies but she's a kid. she doesn't want to be there. finds it incredibly difficult. this is the glare of television cameras putting footage around the world and her own background and her own twitter feed, her facebook posts, all that kind of stuff in her life is now being picked up by the media and they are trying to go after her. you know, it's not a pleasant experience, is it? >> no, and i have to say the candor and the honesty, i just love that moment. when i was watching live i almost fell over laughing to tell you the truth. he says two hours and she goes what? she just doesn't want to be there, and she responds, not like someone who would take the oath -- she's like a kid. she's like i don't want to be here. two hours, are you kidding? now, you know, of usually that's not the way a witness is supposed to behave, but does that tell you that she's lying? not really. i just think it shows that this is a 12th grader. she's still in 12th grade and she really doesn't -- doesn't want to be there. you know, we'll see if she really is discredited in -- on the substance of her testimony, but so far i haven't seen it. >> let's turn now to another matter, also with trayvon martin but also the murder case, of course, today against former patriot's star aaron hernandez. what do you make of this? this guy signed a five year, 40 million dollar contract and on a murder charge. >> it's a circumstance you don't see a lot for good reason. >> okay -- >> it's a lot of questions, just as many questions as we have answers. circumstantially it looks like he's guilty. it looks like everything is against him, but i go back to the ray lewis situation back in 200. 0. he was arrested for murder and held without bail for two weeks and testified against his accomplishes and got northing. so you don't know are they arresting him to try to get him to turn against guys, or are they arresting him because they actually believe he did it -- >> or are they arresting him because the other guy already flipped and turned against him? >> that's the biggest question because some specifics they had on this case, the reason that the motive was supposedly there was he was upset the guy for talking to people he didn't like. someone had to tell them that. >> what is crucial is the weapon, and we have a new photograph from tmz showing hernandez holding a glock handgun in a photo he took himself on a cell phone. gloria, how significant could that be? >> if, in fact, it's the same gun used, we don't know. the search warrants are sealed and warrants seals. we don't know. it's speculation guesses. the attorney is saying this circumstantial evidence, well circumstantial evidence is good evidence and has been used often to convict people. >> and again, is it circle because two guys -- there are two other accomplishes we know, seen on tape and they have records of those guys being there but because the court records are sealed, we don't know if they are telling the police he shot him. >> i interviewed bob recently and we talked about the culture of guns in the nfl. this is another example, if that's what it is, if it turns out he's convicted and used a gun and so on. there is this culture, isn't it, of players having a gun, empowers themselves with a weapon? >> i think there is a culture of guns among young people, and i think that's the issue. people forget nfl players, nba players, most of them are 23, 24, 25. the average career is four years. so a lot of young people and part of that macho image in america right or wrong is you have to have guns, roll with your homies. they don't say i'm out of that situation now. they try to prove to their friends, i haven't changed and that gets them in trouble. >> thank you very much, indeed. >>> more analysis of the zimmermann case and what we can expect tomorrow coming up later in the show. >>> but first, the two men that convinced the supreme court to make the decision today. against proposition eight and join me next and makes a debut right here tonight. . the healthcare law gives us powerful tools to fight it... to investigate it... ...prosecute it... and stop criminals. our senior medicare patrol volunteers... are teaching seniors across the country... ...to stop, spot, and report fraud. you can help. guard your medicare card. don't give out your card number over the phone. call to report any suspected fraud. we're cracking down on medicare fraud. let's make medicare stronger for all of us. >>> the united states supreme court in two important decisions brings us that much closer to true equality. >> today i finally get to look at the man that i love and finally say, will you please marry me? >> bush versus gore, we know how that went but ted olson and david boyce argued against proposition eight and join me tonight. gentlemen, congratulations on a very successful day, obviously. was it a successful as you would wished it to be? >> we are tickled to death with what happened in the supreme court today. it's a victory for the people in california that wish to get married to the person they love. this is what we set out to do. when we first took this case and this is what happened today in the supreme court of the united states. the vindication to be treated with dignity and respect and equality. we could not be happier. >> and i think -- >> if i can -- let me rephrase the question. if i can rephrase the question. are you frustrated, though, despite the success, that we we didn't get today from the supreme court was a decision on a homosexual's constitutional right to get married in america? >> well, what you did get was a decision that i think lays the ground work for decisions all across the country to establish marriage equality in every one of the 50 states. now what happened in the case that we brought in california is that because the governor and the attorney general did not appeal that decision, the supreme court did not have jurisdiction to decide the case on the merit, but what the court did was vacate the appeal and that brought back into effect the district court's decision, and the district court's decision does establish that broad civil right for all americans under the contusion to marry the person they love. you hear the people around here, you'll understand how they are encouraging today's victory. [ cheers ] >> ted olson, i was struck by one comment today by a cardinal who said it's a tragic day for marriage and our nation. i mean, to me, a tragic day for america is 9/11 pearl harbor, not the day the supreme court says that two men or women that love each other can get married. what is your reaction to what the cardinal said? >> my reaction is the same as that, and i want to amp fie what david said. we wanted to overturn proposition eight and that's what happened today. we are talking about people who love one another, who want to be together and if everybody in america can stand where david and i are standing now and looking at the people and the happiness in their faces and eyes that they can now be treated equally with the rest of their citizens in california and this will spread like wildfire all over the united states. today was an unequivocal victory for gay and lesbian individuals and americans who strive for dignity. we are so happy this came out the way it did. >> david, i mean, justice scalia did this long rack to descent, one of the great descents in supreme court history, not happy at all. what was your reaction to that? it seemed to be pretty over the top. >> right, justice scalia has been on the other side of this issue for ten years. ten years ago lawrence against texas was decided, the first major civil rights decision establishing rights for gay and lesbian couples, and the justice descended in that case. one of the things i think is remarkable, though, about the descent is he's very candidate in recognizing that the fight is over. he comes out on the other side, but he's very candidate and honest about saying that the fight is over. once the court decided what it decided today, establishing marriage equality in all 50 states is just a matter of time because it's just a matter of applying the same principles the court articulated today to additional cases from additional states and even his descent that the court's opinion can be written, where all you have to do is substitute a specific state's name for doma and i think he's recognizing, as we all recognize that today is new day has dawned in america. we now have established full equality for gay and lesbian citizens. >> well, a lot of people celebrating down there, and quite rightly. finally, ted olson, what does this mean in terms of the bigger picture? when will people start getting married, gay people in california, do you think in terms of a time scale, and, you know, given what happened today with doma, the hash reality remains that although they can get married in california, the same gay couple who are now entitled to the benefits that have been brought in by this decision, if they go to a state later through work, whatever that doesn't recognize that, they are back where they started. where do you see america given the way and the speed this is moving, is actually moving to what california has in totality? >> i don't know that because it was very difficult to hear your full question, you can hear the enthusiasm here that tends to drowned out part of what you're saying. in terms of talking about a timetable, we don't know exactly when that will occur for legal procedures take awhile before the decision becomes final and it becomes effective in california. we're studying all that. we'll do -- we'll deal with that the same way we dealt with everything else in this case, carefully and we'll know what we're doing before we go forward. soon, tens of thousands of californians will be able to embrace the people they love and get married, and that will spread like wildfire all over the united states. starting today, it's going to go everywhere. >> ted olson and david boys, you famously opposed each other in the past. i prefer you getting together because that seems to be very effective. congratulations on a terrific day and long may you continue to move forward with this in the future. greatly appreciate you coming on the show tonight. >>> next is the return of cross fire, cnn is bringing it back and we got the brand-new team right here first. and they are chomping at the bit. look at them. chomping. look at them kids... they have no idea what it was like before u-verse high speed internet. yeah, you couldn't just stream movies to a device like that. one time, i had to wait half a day to watch a movie. you watched movies?! i was lucky if i could watch a show. show?! man, i was happy to see a sneezing panda clip! trevor, have you eaten today? you sound a little grumpy. [ laughter ] [ male announcer ] connect all your wi-fi-enabled devices with u-verse high speed internet. rethink possible. >>> if you don't mean being called a radical -- >> yes, i do. >> no, i am a radical. >> i don't know why you're so defensive, rush, what is wrong -- >> because i take my business as seriously as you take yours and the term radical implies irresponsible. it implies dangerous -- >> only to you. >> from 1990 that's cross fire with a young rush limbaugh. he says he's not back on cross fire. he's too old and too boring. instead cnn is bringing back the cross fire format with four incredible co-hosts, van jones, stephanie cutter, van jones, welcome to you-all. for the first time, welcome cross fire. very lively. let's get straight into this. newt gingrich you must be absolutely thrilled about the supreme court's decision today. >> i was thrilled you're missing the core point that 8 million californians voted a particular way. the governor and their attorney general refused to defend them, and as a result, the court didn't actually decide the substance of the case. david was clear. the court said there is nobody here who is standing to defend the case, therefore the case is remitted because of that or amended because of that. it strikes me that the 8 million people in cam cal have a reason to be alienated from washington than they were yesterday. >> let me ask you quickly before we go to the rest of the panel, why are you so opposed to gay people having the same rights to get married as you, why? >> first of all, i'm not opposed to gay people having the right to have a relationship -- >> to get married i said. >> much like cardinal, i do believe as a christian the march rig between -- >> cardinal dolan is described it as a tragedy for america, a tragedy two loving people of the same sex can get married like you and me, that's a tragedy for america? >> i think if you want to reject the right of the catholic bishop's collectively, not just him, to actually stand up for their values and you want to say that's -- and you want to do that, that's your right, but in fact, i do believe states are making arrangements. what i object to in this case is very clear cut. you had a 5-4 decision to reject 8 million californians on the ground that 8 million people have standing before the supreme court -- >> no, i hear that. let's go to van jones, it seems you want to get in there. is this a tragedy, van? >> as a christian, if you're concerned about traditional marriage, kim kardashian has done more harm to traditional marriage than any gay person. the institution of marriage is screwed up because of the the straight people. they are viewing up and cheating. the problem we have now is just because you put something on the ballot, if you put it on the ballot in the civil rights of 1950, we wouldn't have them. the court has the job to protect people. i'm glad they did the job. >> this is startling, i think you'll agree with van jones. >> when it comes to property eight i agree with newt. that's a shame. i'm a conservative who happens to support gay rights. i'm a conservative who supports marriage. i'm a conservative who supports gay marriage. so on doma i think there was a victory, but to me the significant ruling in doma wasn't just that the federal government has to acknowledge the right of gay people to marry but the federal government has to acknowledge the right of the states. as a small government conservative who supports federalism, i think this was a huge victory for federalism and if you believe in it with a c then you have to see that as at least a silver lining. >> stephanie cutter, you're putting a face like you've eaten a very, very bad onion or you don't agree with that. >> no, not an onion. i was just waiting to speak. i don't think it was a surprise where i stand. i am very happy about the supreme court's decision today on doma. a lot of us have been against doma for a long time and fighting to overturn it. in terms of the decision on california, yes, 8 million people voted for a ballot initiative. but as van said, people have voted before and have been wrong. that's why we have checks and balances in the government. we have three branchs of government and the courts perform a check on people and vice versa. i think today there was a check on ensuring that people have equality in california. and i think that's why -- >> okay -- >> what we saw in the background of ted and david was a huge celebration. people in california are embracing this. >> you got a lot of happy americans on this tragic day for america. let's move on to texas because texas is fascinating to me right now because you have this extraordinary scene last night with wendy davis doing this 13-hour filibuster. she was three hours short. this is act the fact rick perry and others want to bring in toughest abortion laws in america which shut down abortion clinics in texas. rick perry said texans value life. that's when he said. this was his argument for bringing in these incredible abortion laws. this is the same texas that today celebrated the 500th execution since 1982. >> 500. >> as a valued life, it also has some of the most laxed gun laws that led to some of the most gun deaths in america. again, i questioned how far this valuing life goes in texas. over to you newt, explain to me. >> first of all, the total number of executions you cited for texas over the years is about the same of the number of people killed in chicago last year with among the most restrictive gun laws in america. so i think you're draping a red herring. this law is based on when babies start to feel pain, which is a scientific fact. babies around 20 weeks clearly feel pain and this is a bill which says that if that's -- if you have not had an abortion by the 20th week, that you're now putting the baby through pain, and that's why they drew that particular line. now you can decide you don't care about babies having pain and the woman's right over rides that but the bill is based on scientific studies when babies start to feel pain. >> van? >> you know, part of the reason we want to have this show cross fire because the show which we haven't talked about that much will be a half hour long and one top pick at a time so we can get deep into this stuff. i think a lot of people do feel about the balance here between the fetus and the mother. the problem you've got, though, in texas is this railroading going on from the governor and this new hero. this senator davis has stood up, she stood on her feet for 11 hours, 13 hours and will be a force to be reckoned with. we can't talk about every issue in depth -- i want to see people like her come on your show, cross fire -- >> i'd rather right now here the reaction of -- >> thank you. this lionizing -- >> great leader. >> susan b anthony and frederick douglas and rosa b parks roll over in their grades what is a hero today are so shockingly pathetically low. not to mention democrats used to want abortions to be safe, legal and rare. this bill would introduce those safety precautions, which are common sense, healthy safety precautions. democrats have lost their rational common sense and it will swing back in the other direction as the majority of the country who is in the middle on this issue realizes these positions are extreme. >> if i can just jump in for a second -- >> last word to you, make it brief, please. >> i think it's already swung and it's been against republicans, putting these initiatives forward to restrict women's ability to make their healthcare decisions. if there is any backlash, it will be against republicans. we've actually already seen that in one election. they are digging the hole again and we'll probably see it in the next election. >> i want to say how excited i am about this cross fire coming back. i think it's a great idea. i think your four will be fantastic because i would have liked to kept you on longer tonight and i can't. that's a good sign. that means i'll watch cross fire. most people will watch it to see newt get wound up every night. that alone will be worth the entrance fee. thank you for coming on. great to have you on the show ex come back again soon. looking forward to cross fire starting in the near future. good to see you-all. >>> high drama from the george zimmerman trial, but what will happen in the courtroom tomorrow? we'll tell you what to watch out for, coming up next. >>> tomorrow is day four in the george zimmerman murder trial and if today is any indication, we expect the testimony to be explosive, emotional and surprising. will it hurt or help the prosecution. we have our guests, welcome back to you both. martin, what is likely to happen tomorrow? >> well, i mean, you know, if you were a viewer and a court watcher and you liked this afternoon, you'll love tomorrow because it's more of the same. we'll have rachel jeantel will pick up where she left off. the defense will aggressively try to poke holes in the consistency of her story. they have to be careful because it's a young person and a person traumatically effected because she was the last person to talk to trayvon martin and they were friends. so there are a lot of people that have their opinions about this young woman and how much you can really trust what he says, but in the end really six opinions matter, the jurors and we'll have to wait to see what they say. >> jeffrey toobin, i agree with your take on this. i think the credibility outweighs the occasional inconsistency. i would expect that in somebody in that age to be brutally honest with you. in a bigger picture, do you think we'll see zimmerman give evidence himself? >> not a chance. not a chance. his story will be in front of the jury. he made statements to the police officers. those are count -- those are going to come in. everybody on the jury will know that his defense is self-defense. if he were to take the witness stand, he would be confronted with all the -- at least somewhat contradictory things he said. most defense attorneys avoid putting their clients on the stand. i just think there is almost no chance he will take the witness stand. i don't see what he has to gain by it, and i think he has a lot to lose. >> in terms of the bigger issues this case raises, are we seeing much evidence of race being a factor as many people feared or is it really coming down to a test of florida's self-defense laws? >> well, criminal trials are really always about individual cases. they are not examinations of society and the state of race relations in florida or anywhere else, but it is an unmistakable theme of the trial. the 911 calls where zimmerman keeps saying there is a black kid walking around. there are these black kids that look suspicious. no one will miss the implication that zimmerman had some problem with black people. so yes, this is not really a big case about the state of race relations, but race remains at the heart of this case, and, you know, i think it will only be more present as the trial proceeds. >> jeffrey toobin, martin savidge, a gripping case and i'm sure will continue to be so. thank you both for joining me. >>> comes next, nba champ chris bosh is in the chair, right next to me. here he comes. god, he's huge. how are you? good to see you. >> nice to meet you. >> i'm feeling intimidated. talking about their triumph, lebron james and much more after the break. dad. how did you get here? i don't know. [ speaking in russian ] look, look, look... you probably want to get away as much as we do. with priceline express deals, you can get a fabulous hotel without bidding. think of the rubles you'll save. with one touch, fun in the sun. i like fun. well, that went exactly i as planned.. really? and i've been around the toughest guys in football. and now i'm training guys who leak a little to guard their manhood. with man style protection... whoa... of new depend shields and guards. who are you? this is my house. perfect. come with me. built you a little man space under here. how 'bout that. sweet. see depend shields and guards are made to fit guys. that's awesome. i trained that guy now it's your turn. go online for my tips to help guard your manhood. with new depend, shields and guards. >>> for all those guys who left, you know, make sure they don't come to game seven. we only want the guys who are going to stay in the building for the whole game. you never give up. peop gave up on us, and, you know, they can stay where they are and watch the game at home. >> spoken like a true champion that he is. that's chris bosh who helped the miami heat capture another nba title. i quite agree with you, chris bosh. what the hell were they thinking? slinking out just because you were having a tough game. >> yeah, sometimes it looks bad. but i remember telling my wife, we were watching i think basketball during the regular season. she said oh, it's a ten-point lead, only two minutes left. i said no, you never give up on the game. >> absolutely right. i am a knicks fan, so let me lay my cards on the table. but in this particular competition, i was backing you guys in that final, because i thought there's something about the heat that's magical to watch. great players, top of their game. you get all this flak, don't you? everybody wants to whack the heat. how do you collectively as a team deal with that? >> we rely on each other a lot. i think a lot of it is the way we came together. but we always let it be known that we're here to win basketball games. we're here to have fun, and we're here to work together. we know the common goal of ourselves, and we know the common message that we always put out there. it's always positive. it's always about team work. we just feel if we continue to do that, everything will work out fine. >> your mate lebron has quite some mental strength. he was being told this was the finals that was going to expose him as the lightweight he was. and he did what all great champions do, and had the game of his life in the seventh game. how does he deal with the particular pressure he gets, because it's extraordinary. >> it is extraordinary. everything he deals with. i don't think the world has seen an athlete deal with so much. you know, he was thrust into the spotlight when he was 15, 16 years old. he was supposed to be the next guy, the chosen one. and to actually go through those things and still accomplish some major goals that people never dream of reaching, i think that's special in itself. just the fact that he's able to just overcome every challenge that's come his way is quite remarkable. >> talking remarkable, we've had this big day in the supreme court today and recently nba player jason collins came out. what is your take on this, do you think more professional athlete also have the courage to be more open with things like their sexuality? >> i think so. america is changing, of course, as time goes on things change and people are fighting for rights. and rightfully so, they could. and i think with more people gaining confidence, i think more of that will happen. that's on the fellows who, you know, the guys and the girls who have to really take that step. we don't know anything they're going through. so whatever they're going through in their heads with themselves or with their families, as long as everybody is happy, that's what is most important. >> how have you managed to avoid the normal scandal that goes with almost every top sportsman? you're squeaky clean, a lovely wife, expecting a third child. i couldn't find any skeletons rattling in your closet. am i not trying hard enough? >> i'm a lucky guy. i've been just really blessed to be in this position, not only to play basketball at a high level, when championships, but just to get the opportunity to have great kids, have a beautiful, loving wife who supports me in everything i do. i mean, i tell them that i'm the lucky one. i'm the person who is just lucky to have them in my lives, and i do everything for them. >> i tweeted about you when you did that brilliant pass. i used to play a bit of basketball. only american sport i can claim any knowledge of. you're a champion. there's a few players on that heat team that are natural born winners. what do you think it takes when you literally ironically get the heat, what does it take to win these things. >> against us? >> what does it take for you to win, to be a champion? >> oh, boy. i think just think of the hardest thing you'll probably have to do, taking those challenges and actually beating them. you know, we faced a lot of adversity during the playoffs, especially in game six. i think that was the tipping point of the whole thing. >> what do you say to each other, after that game, you get together, you've escaped by the skin of your teeth, you've got one last chance, what do you say to each other? >> i had two conversations -- during the game? >> just generally, how do you deal with that kind of game where you just about get away with it? >> you have to play the game and luckily it went our way. we went to overtime and won the game. i had two conversations, very short. i went to ray allen, and we were just sitting there in disbelief. he looked to me and said how did you get that rebound and see me? i said, i don't know, you were right there. after that, i walked past lebron, and we were trying to remember what sequence of the game happened and how we got to that last point and we could not remember. it was a very blurry situation, and it was over. >> it was brilliant to watch. a quick shot out to your nonprofit organization, dedicated to helping children and their families. best of luck with that. will lebron be with you next year? >> i'll give him a shout see if he comes. >> chris bosh, great to see you. congratulations again. that's all for us tonight. this is a great day for america, a day america took one step forward to not having bigotry in this country. tomorrow night, we'll have all the latest from the george zimmerman trial. anderson cooper starts right now. >>> good evening, everyone. welcome to our special continuing coverage of the george zimmerman trial. tonight, a big ruling and high drama in the courtroom. the prosecution putting their star witness on the stand, a female friend of trayvon martin who was on the phone with him as the fatal confrontation began. from the initial questioning to the cross-examination ran the gamete. we're going show a lot of it tonight to you. a warning as well. some of the language was harsh in the courtroom. so if you would rather not hear it, we'll tell you when to turn the volume down. with that in mind, turn the volume down now, if you don't want to hear that language. here's randi kaye's report. >> reporter: rachel jeantel and trayvon martin were good
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Jul 1, 2013 11:00pm PDT
savidge, cnn, sanford, florida. >> martin's going to join us in a little bit to talk about what went on in the courtroom today. joining me is senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin, and sunny hostin. on the defense side, danny savalos and mark geragos. all four of you, i want to throw this question out to all four of you, do any of you believe that the prosecution had a particularly good day today? does anybody believe that the prosecution is as a step closer to proving their case? anderson, could i -- i have a theory about this. i think that was has happened here, this is -- and, jeff, i have no evidence of this, so i'll say that as a disclaimer, when the police did not arrest him, they found him to be credible, they thought that they weren't going to file. i think that what has happened here, is that when the state's attorney filed this case, they feel like the police were thrown under the bus. and i think the police are now engaging in payback, and when those questions that o'meara asked to get those answers out of the officers, to me is stunning. anden anderson, i assume your question was
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Jun 27, 2013 6:00pm PDT
call him back or he'll call me back, sir. >> martin savidge is outside the courthouse. martin, a rather dramatic change in the way that she conducted herself today. >> reporter: oh, yeah, absolutely, piers. that's what everybody nope 'tissed, she dressed slightly different but she had been advised. she sounded that way, too, with of course, the yes, sir. unfortunately, just as you point out, the more she said yes, sir, it got a sharper and sharper edge to it. the defense worked very hard to try to disappoint semible her account. john west wanted to show she gave testimony prior to getting on the stand that was different from on the stand. just as you played that tense showdown, there were a number of them where they went toe to toe. she's 19 and he's a veteran defense expert and she held her ground on serious issues she stood firm. the question is will the jury believe her account? >> let's take a look at her da meaner. let's look. >> you didn't have information from the news this was racially charged. >> no, i don't watch the news. >> okay. are you okay this morning? >> yes. >>
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Jul 1, 2013 5:00pm PDT
truth? >> yes. >> martin savidge, cnn, sanford, florida. >> martin's going to join us in a little bit to talk about what went on in the courtroom today. joining me is senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin, and sunny hostin. on the defense side, danny savalos and mark geragos. all four of you, i want to throw this question out to all four of you, do any of you believe that the prosecution had a particularly good day today? does anybody believe that the prosecution is as a step closer to proving their case? anderson, could i -- i have a theory about this. i think that was has happened here, this is -- and, jeff, i have no evidence of this, so i'll say that as a disclaimer, when the police did not arrest him, they found him to be credible, they thought that they weren't going to file. i think that what has happened here, is that when the state's attorney filed this case, they feel like the police were thrown under the bus. and i think the police are now engaging in payback, and when those questions that o'meara asked to get those answers out of the officers, to me is stunning. anden anderson,
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Jul 3, 2013 11:00pm PDT
get underway with martin savidge. >> reporter: the hooded sweatshirt trayvon martin wore the night he was kill sd a key piece of evidence. the state expert found no trace of george zimmerman's dna on that sweatshirt, not near the coughs or the fists and no dna found under martin's fingernails. on the gun, which acore cording to zimmerman reached and touched. >> the swab from the pistol grip of the defendant's gun was positive for blood, correct? >> yes. >> and then there was a mixture, the major matched the defendant george zimmerman? >> yes. >> and you were able to exclude trayvon martin as having dna on the pistol grip, correct? >> yes, trayvon martin was excluded from being a possible mixture. >> reporter: the hoodie was tested saying zimmerman's gun was actually touching the fabric when he fired the fatal shot. >> what did you find distance-wise when you conducted the test with the sweatshirt. >> it is consistent with a contact shot. >> so again, evidence saying that the end of the gun was against the material when it was fired? >> yes. >> the prosecution also pointed out the n
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Jul 3, 2013 5:00pm PDT
will do when it gets underway but we get underway with martin savidge. >> reporter: the hooded sweatshirt trayvon martin wore the night he was kill sd a key piece of evidence. the state expert found no trace of george zimmerman's dna on that sweatshirt, not near the coughs or the fists and no dna found under martin's fingernails. on the gun, which acore cording to zimmerman reached and touched. >> the swab from the pistol grip of the defendant's gun was positive for blood, correct? >> yes. >> and then there was a mixture, the major matched the defendant george simmzimmerman? >> yes. >> and you were able to exclude trayvon martin as having dna on the pistol grip, correct? >> yes, trayvon martin was excluded from being a possible mixture. >> reporter: the hoodie was tested saying zimmerman's gun was actually touching the fabric when he fired the fatal shot. >> what did you find distance-wise when you conducted the test with the sweatshirt. >> it is consistent with a contact shot. >> so again, evidence saying that the end of the gun was against the material when it was fired? >> y
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Jul 3, 2013 7:00pm PDT
that's had nothing but big days so far. martin savidge starts us off. >> reporter: though the symbol to many, the hooded sweatshirt trayvon martin wore the night he was killed is also a key piece of evidence. the state expert said he found no trace of george zimmerman's dna on that sweatshirt, not each on the sleeves or cuffs nearest to the fist the defendant says trayvon martin was hitting him with. and no zimmerman dna was found on martin's fingernails. what about martin's dna, was it found on the gun which by one zimmerman account, the teen actually reached for and touched. >> a swab or the dna that you developed from the pistol grip of the defendant's gun, it was positive for blood, correct? >> yes. >> and then there was a mixture, the major was matched to the defendant, george zimmerman? >> yes. >> and you were able to exclude trayvon martin as having dna on the pistol grip, is that correct? >> yes. trayvon martin was excluded as being a possible contributor to this mixture on the grip. >> reporter: the hoody was also tested by a firearms expert who said zimmerman's gun was actuall
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Jul 2, 2013 1:00am PDT
. we begin with martin savidge. >> and sanford police officer doris singleton was the first to interview zimmerman the night he shot trayvon martin and said he seemed surprised to learn the teen had died. >> yes, at some point, i had said that we weren't able to identify the victim. and he said, well, what do you mean you haven't been able to identify him? i said we don't know who he is. and he said, he's dead? and i said, i thought you knew that. i thought you knew he was dead. and he kind of slung his head and just shook it. >> in a recording in that interview, zimmerman again repetitious the line prosecutors say went his state of mind. >> there's been a few times where i've seen a suspicious person in the neighborhood. we call the police a nonemergency line and these guys always get away. >> the state could be tends zimmerman instantly profiled martin that night pointing to his written statement in which he repeatedly described martin as the suspect. and prosecutors attempted to show how zimmerman's account changed with each retelling. in his first interview, he said martin
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Jul 3, 2013 8:00pm PDT
. lots to talk about with our expert panel. we get underway right now though, with martin savidge. >> reporter: though a symbol to many, the hooded sweat shirt trayvon martin wore the night he was killed is also a key piece of evidence. the state expert said he found no trace of george zimmerman's dna on that sweatshirt, not even on the sleeves or cuffs nearest to the fists the defense says trayvon martin was hitting him with. and no zimmerman dna was found under martin's fingernails. and was trayvon martin's dna found on the gun? >> a swab or dna that you developed from the pistol grip of the defendant's gun, it was positive for blood, correct? >> yes. >> and then there was a mixture, the major was matched to the defendant, george zimmerman. >> yes. >> and you were able to exclude trayvon martin as having dna on the pistol grip, is that correct? >> yes. trayvon martin was excluded to being a possible contributor to this mixture on the grip. >> reporter: the hoody was also tested who said zimmerman's gun was actually touching the fabric when he fired the fatal shot. >> what did you find distan
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Jun 29, 2013 3:00pm PDT
shooting death of teenager trayvon martin was second degree murder. but as cnn's martin savidge reports now, at least a few of those witnesses seemed to bolster zimmerman's claim that he shot -- he shot in self-defense. >> reporter: what jonathan good saw the night trayvon martin died goes to the heart of the zimmerman case. >> that night that you saw, the person who you now know to be trayvon martin was on top, correct? >> correct. >> and he was the one who was raining blows down on the person on the bottom, george zimmerman, right? >> that's what it looked like. >> reporter: good lives in the subdivision where the shooting took place. he was watching from his patio about 15 to 20 feet away. zimmerman that night was wearing a red and black jacket. martin a dark hooded sweatshirt. >> the color of clothing on top, what could you see? >> it was dark. >> how about the color of clothing on the bottom? >> i believe it was a light white or red color. >> reporter: but that's not all good says he saw. he witnessed physical blows being thrown and then a style mixed martial arts. >> what you saw
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Jul 2, 2013 12:00am PDT
concern? >> no, sir. >> you think he was telling the truth? >> yes. >> reporter: martin savidge, cnn, sanford, florida. >> and again, more testimony resuming in just a few hours. >>> well, a brutal heat wave is happening in the western u.s. >> and it's breaking records. it's causing some serious damage as well. we'll have more on that when we come back. >>> and there's been another shocker at wimbledon. serena williams and her stunning defeat. please stay with us. you're watching "cnn newsroom." >>> there's record heat in the west, flooding in the east. we're covering the extreme weather on both sides of the united states from sea to shining sea i guess. >> a lot of weather extremes. meteorologist ivan cabrera joins us. and ivan, they're used to hot weather out west, but this is not anything they're used to. >> they haven't seen this before, have they? >> it's been crazy stuff over the last few days. unbelievable. this is what happens when you get the atmospheric traffic jam here. when things don't move in the atmosphere, that is what happens. and that's what we've had over the last
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Jul 3, 2013 10:00pm PDT
won't happen until friday after the 4th of july hole day. martin savidge, cnn, sanford, florida. >> forensic scientist from the john j. college and legal analyst and sunny hostin. and killer ambition. on the defense side, an inside look at how the criminal justice system works and sometimes doesn't. i want to start with you. the firearms expert testified the gun was touching trayvon martin's sweatshirt when george zimmerman fired. that's not what the autopsy showed. >> that's right. i find it mysterious. she did all of the right things. she test fired with the garments and concluded it was a contact shot. there were two garments the hoodie sweatshirt and underlying sweatshirt and the body. she's looking at gunshot residue, burned and unburned particles and the tearing and singeing of the fibers around the hull. the conclusion is clear and makes sense to me it was a contact shot. what is mysterious is the autopsy report indicates not that it was a close shot or a contact shot but it was an intermediate distance shot which tells me it was probably between six and 18 inches. >> so
CNN
Jun 29, 2013 7:00am PDT
top grab the person on the bottom's head and slam it into the concrete? >> no. >> martin savidge is outside the courthouse. that's important system because george zimmerman said he was in fear for his life when he shot trayvon martin and the defense -- or the prosecution is trying to prove that george zimmerman's head was not being slammed into the concrete. there was no -- he was in no danger of dying that night. >> reporter: right. that's exactly the point. in fact, even though this witness who jonathan good had come out and said that, you know, he could identify who was on top and who was on the bottom, that keep point the prosecution was able to make was that, well, you didn't see him though driving his head into the ground which is something the defense has really pushed forward because that is why george zimmerman said he felt his life was in danger. he literally felt like his head was going to explode. later though, the last person to testify was lindsey fulgate. she's a physicians assistant, the person who treated george zimmerman the very next day about the injuries. now, o
CNN
Jul 2, 2013 4:00pm PDT
photograph have come from a single blow? >> single, in fact, yes. >> cnn's martin savidge is here with me in sanford, florida. he's been reporting live on this trial from the very beginning, in fact, since the entire case began. so let's talk about that moment and whether in cross-examination george zimmerman's attorney was able to clean up some of that damage. >> reporter: yeah, you're right, ashleigh. nice to see you, by the way. a huge moment in court. and it really was looking bad for the defense, because, after all, this is really the crux of what they've been saying, that george zimmerman, having his head by trayvon martin, beaten repeated into the ground, felt he was going to die. and as a result of that, reached for his weapon and eventually shot and killed trayvon martin. so listening to the medical examiner describe things as she did, it sounded bad. but then, mark o'mara begins the cross-examination, and as he has done so many times with other prosecution witnesses, begins to turn the testimony. listen. >> it's your position that it's consistent that george zimmerman may have rece
CNN
Jun 26, 2013 6:00pm PDT
to some language we can't repeat here. martin savidge has the latest. a dramatic day in court today. >> reporter: an incredible day. this was a witness everyone had been waiting to see, high lly anticipated is not leveling enough. this young lady as you pointed out, was on the phone with martin at the time he crossed paths with zimmerman. it's the critical moment and she has the answers, at least from the state's perspective, as to what really went on. a number of things she brought out and this is all for the prosecution. she says on the phone with trayvon, trayvon says i'm being followed. this is at the time george zimmerman identified trayvon martin in the neighborhood. then later she says she can hear over the telephone someone confronting trayvon martin, and she says it's george zimmerman. so already, we're seeing a change here. and then on top of that later, she hears trayvon saying get off, get off, well, that would imply that george zimmerman is now the aggressor and on top or at least trying to get on top of the young teenager. so, this would all fly directly in the face of
CNN
Jun 26, 2013 9:00pm PDT
. cnn's martin savidge has all of the latest. a dramatic day in court today. >> it was an incredible day. this was a witness that everyone had been waiting to see. highly anticipated is not leveling it up enough. the young woman that you pointed out was on the phone with him. it's the critical moment. she has the answers of what went on. she says. >> she can hear one confronting trayvon martin and she says it's george zimmerman. so already we're seeing a change here. and then on tom-to-op that later she haerz trayvon saying get off. that would imply that george zimmerman is on top or at least trying to get on top of the young teenager. so this would all fly directly in the face of self-defense, that george zimmerman has been proclaiming. however this young witness has a lot of credibility issues and that's of course what the defense was going after saying her testimony has changed over time and she has admitted to lying in this case. pier piers? >> she had a strange demeanor, irritated in parts, very annoyed at some of the questioning, didn't want to come back. how will that play for
CNN
Jun 28, 2013 2:00pm PDT
of the george zimmerman second degree murder trial. martin savidge is joining us. you've been covering it from the beginning. give us your quick assessment of what we're heard, it was good for bad for george zimmerman, what we heard from lindsay folgate, the physician assistant. >> it was missed. the opinion she was he thought he was going to die at the hands of trayvon mart rngs that's why he had to shoot and i'm not sure that for the defense, she really painted that picture of a man who was facing that. that said, however, there's the other issue the she brought up, the mma. that he was apparently going to a gym where there was mixed martial arts. that played heavier in earlier testimony. the person who is said to be on top delivering the beating looked like they were using an mma style. so, a very crucial day. key testimony without a doubt, wolf. >> what did you think, mark? criminal defense attorney, legal analyst. what did you think of this final day of the week's testimony? >> i think it was an exhausting day for everybody involved. i think there was a lot of testimony a
CNN
Jul 2, 2013 9:00pm PDT
could file the investigators. that could be very fascinating. >> could be fascinating. martin savidge thank you very much. terrific job on a dramatic court case. >>> joining me to break down the twists and turns in this case so far, welcome to you both. it's very, very difficult to assess this case, despite everybody's efforts to say it's not about race without bringing the race element into it, isn't it? >> oh, absolutely. this case is shot through with race from the very beginning. we saw the way the police responded to the killing of trayvon martin. we saw their failure to investigate, the slow investigation, the fact they tested trayvon and not zimmerman for toxins on the body. this is a racial utilized conversation and since the trial started. it's only gotten worse. when rachel took the stand, when the term cracker comes up, that become as racial conversation. i mean, it's unimaginable that trial isn't about race. the question is can the jurors make an objective determination not from a place where race doesn't exist but hold it at arm's length and make a fair judgement. >> we heard g
CNN
Jul 2, 2013 11:00pm PDT
>> they were not life threatening. they were very insignificant. they did not require any sutures to be applied. so i would refer to them insignificant injuries. >> reporter: on cross-examination, the defense attorney implied she owed her job to the special prosecutor in the zimmerman case. and then walked her back from defendant's head consistent with repeatedly having been slammed into a concrete surface? >> no. >> why not >> because the injuries are so minor, that to me the word "slam" implies great force. and this -- the resulting injuries are not great force. >> what type and extent of injuries would you expect to see if the defendant's head had been repeatedly slammed into a concrete surface? >> if somebody's head is repeatedly slammed against concrete with great force, i slamming, your common understanding of slamming, are the injuries to the back of the defendant's head consistent with having been repeatedly slammed book about the case. >> you wrote a book where you quoted what the defendant, george zimmerman, told you, correct? >> correct. >> and you recall in that book writing, do you have a problem with that, that's what he said trayvon martin said? >> right. correct. >> reporter: in that book, he says zimmerman said martin tried to reach for the weapon on his hip, actually touching the gun. >> the defendant is claiming that the victim actually grabbed the gun, grabbed the -- >> that was my understanding, that he grabbed the gun. >> reporter: but a latent print technician found no trace of martin's prints but conceded rain could have washed it away. >> so fingerprints may have exited on an item that you have lift a latent from and there be no latents whatsoever, correct? >> correct. >> even though it's been handled by two or three people? >> that's correct. >> reporter: osterman wrote that zimmerman held down his hands, fearing he might be still be a threat, but the teen's hands were underneath his body. >> you call that being underneath his body? >> yes, sir. >> could someone say that was inconsistent? >> yes. >> reporter: the jury being told the ignore a key moment of monday's testimony. that moment, when the defense attorney got the stanford police department's lead investigator to say he believed zimmerman told him the truth. martin savidge, cnn, florida. >> we're going to speak with mark o'mara later on in the program, as well as a attorney for trayvon martin's family. as always, we have the best legal team around and a forensic scientist here. and former federal prosecutor sunny hostin, jeffrey toobin. danny savalos and mark geragos are all here. we heard from the medical examiner, saying that zimmerman's wounds were not significant. do you agree? >> i don't. first of all, you can bet on the fact that the defense will have a medical examiner that will contradict everything that we heard today. yes, these wounds appear to be superficial. that does not mean that george zimmerman was not in fear for his life. and further more, although wounds can appear to be superficial, there can be a great deal of serious, underlying trauma. for example, subdural hematoma can result in death. >> so somebody can have their head slammed and have just that little laceration? >> yes. >> zimmerman said several times he was slammed repeatedly. i want to listen to more of what the medical examiner said today. >> doctor, using your definition of slamming, your common understanding of slamming, are the injuries to the back of the defendant's head consistent with repeatedly having been slammed into a concrete surface? >> no. >> why not >> because the injuries are so minor, that to me the word "slam" implies great force. and this -- the resulting injuries are not great force. >> what type and extent of injuries would you expect to see if the defendant's head had been repeatedly slammed into a concrete surface? >> if somebody's head is repeatedly slammed against concrete with great force, i would expect lacerations, i would expect a lot of injury that would necessitate suturing. so i don't see that in this picture. >> mark, what do you make of her testimony? and does it matter as long as george zimmerman felt his life was in danger or he believed he i would bet that there's never on twitter who follow "ac 360," i would bet that there's never been anybody that she's treated who was -- who needed her help. i think she, if anything, was a disaster for the prosecution. the idea that she thinks that three slams on the head against a concrete curb couldn't do damage to you, i just think it's laughable. i don't understand what she's talking about. i've had cases, i have defended within the last 24 months murder cases where my client was who hit the concrete curb one with murder. worst defense expert that you would get, and somehow the prosecution thinks this is helpful? only in sunny's world would this be helpful. >> sunny, you think this was helpful for the prosecution? >> of course it was helpful. >> of course it was helpful. i've got to tell you, i just don't know which trial mark, my friend, is watching. zimmerman to have used deadly force, the standard is reasonable. there was no great bodily injury. show you the pictures of george just the pictures. it's his reaction. >> sunny, sunny, then you're t 0 test. to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess with cialis. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or if you have any allergic reactions such as rash, hives, swelling of the lips, tongue or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. where over seventy-five percent of store management started as i'm the next american success story. working for a company hourly associates. there's opportunity here. i can use walmart's education benefits to get a degree, maybe work in it, or be an engineer, helping walmart conserve energy. even today, when our store does well, i earn quarterly bonuses. when people look at me, i hope they see someone working their way up. vo: opportunity, that's the real walmart. >>> whatever you think of george zimmerman's guilt or innocence, you can't help but notice the anguish on trayvon martin's parents. they have to trust that prosecutors are doing the best job they can. it hasn't been easy for the family and can't be easy for the lawyers, watching the state seem to struggle with the witnesses and perhaps with the case itself. i spoke it over with martin family attorney jasmine rand. how do you think the prosecution has done so far? i've talked to a lot of analysts who think they are having a tough time proving second degree murder at there point. >> i think the prosecution has done exceptionally well in this case. from the beginning, they told us they were going to show zimmerman's tangled web of lies. that's exactly what we're seeing unfold before us now. the detective walls a very strong witness for the case, and he started to unfold some of zimmerman's inconsistencies. >> i don't know anybody, though, who thinks detective serino was a strong witness for the prosecution. just about everybody discussing this case has said that they have never seen a police officer testify so favorably for the defense. a police officer that's been called by the prosecution. >> i think what we also have to remember is that detective serino, whether or not this information gets to the jury, it's important for the american people to know that he recommended manslaughter charges for george zimmerman. >> what does that tell you? >> there were a lot of inconsistencies in george zimmerman's story and he did not find george zimmerman's version of what happened credible. and we've heard him say that today. and we have to remember that we can't consider his statement and testimony in a vacuum. we have to compare it with what we hear the other witnesses say to uncover george zimmerman's inconsistencies. >> the fact that he himself did not think that a second degree murder charge was warranted, doesn't that also tell you that given his look at the evidence, he actually thought that, as he's testified on the stand, that zimmerman was pretty credible in the things he said, that his story actually held up? >> no, not at all. because he said he was also in the initial stages of his investigation and it was pointed out today that detective serino had not considered all the evidence that the state attorney's office has considered. >> trayvon martin's parents have been to court every day, sometimes been quite emotional. how are they doing at this point? are they confident with the prosecution's case thus far? >> they're confident with the prosecution's case. it's been very emotionally toiling time for them. i think to have to hear their son crying for help repeatedly, that's a different kind of pain. hearing your child scream for help and not be able to help him. >> i want to go back to the police officer's testimony. there was a lot of talk yesterday, even some suggestion that perhaps their testimony, because it was in a lot of people's opinions, clearly not yours, but so favorable to the defense that this was payback for difficulties between law enforcement and the prosecution. >> i didn't perceive it that way. i think that's all speculation. i think we are going to see the prosecution bring the tangled web of lies home during the closing. >> but you talk about a tangled web of lies, but that's not what the police themselves were saying, the police who investigated this. in cross-examination by mark o'mara, it seemed pretty clear that the police officers felt like george zimmerman's statements basically held up. there were a few minor inconsistencies he said that trayvon martin came out of the bushes, the location of trayvon martin's hands, et cetera. but overall, the police seemed relatively satisfied with what george zimmerman told them time and time again. >> i think that these were not minor inconsistencies. some of the big ones were george zimmerman claiming he was so severely injured that he had to pull out a gun and kill trayvon. that's not what we heard from detective serino. he said he didn't believe george zimmerman was punched 25 or 30 times. we heard the medical examiner say george zimmerman's injuries are not consistent with somebody punched over a dozen times, but only punched once. and had his head hit on the concrete only one time, as well. >> jasmine rand, thank you. >> thank you. >> she was an attorney for trayvon martin's family. now the other side. mark o'mara joins us and spoke with me earlier tonight. mark, this morning judge nelson threw out an exchange between you and the lead investigator, chris serino, that took place yesterday in court and i want to play that for the viewers. >> if we were to take pathological liar off the table as a possibility just for the purposes of this next question, do you think he was telling the truth? >> yes. >> how important was that answer to your case? >> well, you know, i respect the judge's ruling, but i think that a chief investigating officer in a case, when he has to determine credibility to witnesses, including the suspect, i think he should be able to give insight as to what he thinks when he's doing his investigation. but it was sort of a comment on the credibility of another witness, and we have a rule that addresses that. >> i talked to an attorney for the martin family who said they were pleased with the testimony given by the lead investigator. but every other analyst that i have talked to, former prosecutors, defense attorneys, they say they've never seen police officers testifying so favorably for a defense witness. are you pleased with how the cross-examination has gone, with what the police, particularly the lead investigator have told you? >> we're very happy about most of the witnesses we have talked about told the truth. if they told the truth and it's favorable to the defense, so be it. as long as they're telling the truth, we'll find justice at the end of the trial. i'm surprised that the martin family attorneys would think that chris serino's testimony was somewhat favorable to the prosecution, because it truly seemed as though most of what he was saying supported self-defense. >> tomorrow morning, judge nelson is expected to rule on whether or not george zimmerman's criminal course work, in particular florida's stand your ground law, if it can be add misible. i know you don't think it should believe. why not? >> if they start bringing journal's past into the table, it brings what trayvon martin brings to the table, all of his violent acting we know about and some of the fighting he was involved in. if that's not going to be on the table, i think what george has done in the past shouldn't be on the table, as well. they're suggesting that george heard something about stand your ground in some course work and have no idea whether or not he was present in class. he didn't get a great grade in the course either. it was textbook that had information with nothing to do with florida law. >> there have been inconsistencies in statements that george zimmerman has given. he talked about trayvon martin coming out of bushes, the positioning of trayvon martin's hands have been raised. to you, are those inconsequential? >> whether or not he came out of the bushes or darkness, i don't think that somebody who went through a traumatic event is going to be expected to remember everything the best he can. so i'm not worried about that type of inconsistency. the idea that george held his hands out for ten seconds is quite significant. i think the medical examiners will talk about it, that trayvon martin easily just brought his hands back in. even john good suggested that trayvon martin was clutching his hands. why would george make something like that up in the second that he had to do it? it makes much more sense that it happened. >> it seems the trial is moving fairly quickly. is the time line going faster than you expected or about what you expected it to be? >> it's faster than i expected. i think the state may be done tomorrow or friday. that means we'll start here friday or monday and we'll probably take most of next week. maybe not. there are still some decisions the court has to make about the admissibility of certain evidence. if that's allowed, that could extend the testimony by two or three days. >> how is your client feeling? can you say? >> he's still very afraid. the state of florida is trying to take away his liberty and put him in prison the rest of his life. he's very worried and stressed. he's glad he has his day in court. but this is very real to everyone, most importantly george zimmerman. we have the state of florida suggesting that he killed trayvon martin in some ill will and hatred when the evidence supports self-defense. >> because of these audio and videotapes of your client talking to police, he's been able to essentially give his version of events without being cross examined. you cannot see at this point putting george zimmerman on the stand, can you? >> i always make that decision -- the first decision point is whether or not i believe the state has proven their case beyond a reasonable doubt. if i think they have, then i make the consideration whether or not to put any client on the stand. i make that dynamically. i've not gotten to the point where i have convinced myself where the state has done what they need to do to get to a jury. if they come up with something in the next day or two, i may revisit that decision. >> at this point, do you see having to mount a lengthy defense here? >> we have a lot of witnesses that we want to present to the jury to let -- to counter some of the things put out there by the state. so we're going to put on a case. >> mark o'mara, thank you. >>> for more on the story, go to cnn.com. up next, we'll see what prosecutors may be hoping to prove about zimmerman's use of that particular weapon. and we remember the hero firefighters who gave their lives protecting the people of arizona, including two cousins who perished while doing what they loved to do. also the latest from egypt ahead. tion, for it's smog. but there are a lot of people that do ride the bus. and now that the busses are running on natural gas, they don't throw out as much pollution to the earth. so i feel good. i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment. to take a centrum silver multivitamin every day. i told him, sure. can't hurt, right? 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[ laughter ] [ male announcer ] connect all your wi-fi-enabled devices with u-verse high speed internet. rethink possible. >>> as we reported at the top of the program, george zimmerman's best friend took the witness stand, testifying as a prosecution evidence. he's the one who apparently convinced zimmerman to purchase a gun. here's part of his testimony. >> it was actually you who assisted him when he decided that he needed a firearm, correct? >> that is correct. >> and did he tell you the reason why he wanted to get a firearm? >> he -- he asked what would -- whether he should or shouldn't to start with. i recommended that he should. anybody that's not a convicted felon should carry a firearm. >> that's sort of your life philosophy. >> that's my opinion, correct. >> being armed is better than not being armed? >> police aren't always there. >> the type of gun that zimmerman purchased is easy to carry and conceal. osterman advised him to always carry it, so zimmerman had it with him the night he encountered trayvon martin. david mattingly on what prosecutors may be trying to prove with zimmerman's use of it. >> reporter: listen, if you're following the george zimmerman case, you probably heard this sound before. [ gunfire ] that's the sound of a shot from a keltic pf-9 handgun, just like the one caught on a 911 call the moment george zimmerman killed trayvon martin. >> there's gunshots. >> you just heard gunshots? >> yes. >> reporter: zimmerman carried the gun legally. but prosecutors seem to suggest he was doing more than that. >> it wasn't necessary for the defendant to rack it to load a round. it was ready to go. >> reporter: zimmerman was carrying the gun with the bullet already loaded in the chamber and ready to fire. was this a sign he was planning to do harm when he encountered trayvon martin? gun safety inspector larry holt told me zimmerman was doing exactly what he was supposed to do. was he carrying it properly? >> properly if i was ready to defend myself, you bet. >> reporter: holt says this gun is designed strictly for personal protection. one of the cheaper guns on the market selling for between $300 and $400. made to be concealed, carried and ready to shoot. it's called carrying hot. you recommend to your students to carry this one hot? >> absolutely. >> reporter: that's because it comes with a safety feature. an extra long trigger pull that prevents accidental firing. but we also learned watching this trained marksman that's not all it does. >> you missed. >> i know. it's not a real accurate gun. >> reporter: it's only effective in close quarters. something else noted by prosecutors. have you ever heard a prosecutor raise these points before? >> no, i have not. >> reporter: state attorneys could be targeting specific jurors by trying to use the features of zimmerman's own gun against him. >> i think amongst those people familiar with firearms, that line of argument would be totally unpersuasive. but to someone unsophisticated in the juice use of firearms, it could be risky. >> reporter: of the six jurors, four have family members that own guns. one used to have a concealed weapons permit. the hand guns are popular in this part of florida. the home office is only about 60 miles away from where george zimmerman used to live. we contacted them for information on the pf-9. they did not reply. david mattingly, cnn, sanford, florida. >> that's one of the things we'll be watching, how the prosecution tries to use those facts. let's get caught up with some of the other stories we're following. susan? >> the obama administration is postponing a key provision of the affordable care act, the requirement that businesses provide workers with health insurance will be delayed by one year. penalties will now begin by 2015. business owners expressed concerns about the complexity of the reporting requirement. >>> edward snowden's options for asylum are shrinking. 11 of 21 countries says they can't consider his request until he shows up at one of their embassies or at one of their borders. three have said no outright. bolivia and venezuela have signaled they may give him asylum. >>> and dennis rodman said he deserves a nobel peace prize for his outreach to north korea. rodman met with the dictator early this year during his controversial trip to the country. >> we'll see about that one. thank you very much. >>> coming up, what we learned about the granite mountain hot shot who made it out of the fire alive on sunday. he was the only one on that team to come out. an excruciating experience for him, obviously. >>> also ahead, a loss for one family, robert and grant caldwell were among the hot shots that died. they were cousins, two young men with their whole lives ahead of them. and the latest from egypt ahead. the ones getting involved and staying engaged. they're not afraid to question the path they're on. because the one question they never want to ask is "how did i end up here?" i started schwab for those people. people who want to take ownership of their investments, like they do in every other aspect of their lives. we know it's your videoconference of the day. hi! hi, buddy! that's why the free wifi and hot breakfast are something to smile about. book a great getaway now and feel the hamptonality >>> in arizona, hundreds of firefighters trying to get control of the deadliest wildfire in the state's history, the one that killed 19 members of the granite mountain hot shots over the weekend. the 8400 acre fire is 0% contained right now. four military flames were flown in to help battle the flames, to drop water and fire retardant. we now know the name of the 20th hot shot who was on the burning mountain sunday, the only one to come out alive. his name is brendan mcdonough. he was serving as a lookout when his teammates were overtaken by the fire. so what do we know about brendan? i can't imagine what it's like for him to have survived the loss of 19 of his brothers. >> reporter: yeah, just like you might imagine, anderson, he's having a very, very tough time. he's telling people in his inner circle he's not speaking publicly about this. but on his father's facebook page, he posted the pictures that you're seeing, pictures of his son as a firefighter. his father writing, proud of you, son, glad you're alive. he's telling his friends that he's feeling guilty. he was assigned to a lookout position, separate from the rest of the crew. he was up in a higher position. he was watching the fire. the fire got too close to him. he had to move. he hit what's called a trigger point. as he was moving, he was radioing his crew, and at that point, then he lost contact with his crew. the fire department very clearly stating in a news conference just in the last couple of hours that he did exactly what he was supposed to do, that this was a weather event. extraordinary weather that the fire department is talking about that led to the deaths of these 19 firefighters. we spoke with a firefighter who came here to this memorial site. he fought fires with brendan and he says he cannot imagine what this man is going through. here's what he told us. >> it's going to be tough. he lost his crew, you know, and i don't know what to -- i couldn't put myself in his shoes, i couldn't. i couldn't do it. >> reporter: mcdonough did release this statement through his fire department. the fire department saying -- >> reporter: he is telling friends, anderson, that this could take weeks, months. he's never going to forget about this. >> forecasters saying that winds could reach 80 miles per hour there. what's the latest on the actual fire? >> reporter: what i can tell you is that it is 0% contained. you can see for yourself, though. thunder clouds are behind me, the winds are very erratic. that's been the biggest problem with fighting this fire, and that's what they're looking at. but something we want to point out, anderson, is that for the very first time in that news conference, they did announce a shift. there's been a tone shift. the firefighters are saying and overnight they're hoping to announce some progress. hoping very soon that they will say that they have made some sort of progress in knocking this fire down. >> let's hope so. we're learning more about the 19 young men who died. brendan's fellow hot shots. the people who knew and loved them and are now mourning them say they wouldn't want to be remembered as victims. they knew the dangers of their job. they were heroes every time they faced a fire, and they'll be remembered as hero as they should. one family lost two young men in the fire. gary tuchman now reports. >> reporter: robert caldwell was 23 years old. so proud to be a hot shot fireman. when he died, he was still a newlywed. claire caldwell is now his widow. >> he was an inspiration. he saved my life. he made me want to be a better personal. he was the best person i've ever met in my life. >> reporter: but the family's grief doesn't end there. robert's first cousin, 21-year-old grant, was also killed in the fire. he was engaged to be married. may hoffman is the grandmother of both of the young men. laurie is their aunt. >> it's just really hard. it seems surreal. it seems like they're just going to come back. don't you, mom? >> yeah, i just hope that i could wake up and it would be a really bad dream. >> reporter: there's so much pride for what grant and robert did to protect people. their relatives were always concerned when they didn't hear from them for hours on end while fighting fires. but family members knew they were doing what they loved. however, now the pain is so immense. >> i had hoped that both of my boyed hey died from smoke inhalation, because i figured that would knock them out quick and they wouldn't know anything. and then she told me yesterday that -- my daughter, linda, robert's mother, was asked where his dental records were. and i figured if you need dental records, that means -- i guess they were burned. >> we don't know. >> reporter: you should take great comfort in the fact that your grandsons, your nephews, died heroes. that will always be their legacy. claire also says robert was her personal hero. >> he was the most beautiful, selfless, caring, selfless, he cared about people, everyone. he was so compassionate. his goal in life was to help people. and we talked about it all the time. we talked about if he died doing this. and he said that's how he wanted to die. >> reporter: claire has a 5-year-old son from before she met robert. she said robert loved him as much as she did. a testimony to the great man he was. >> i don't want anyone to forget him. ever. >> reporter: may hoffman says her husband, the grandpa, died not that long ago. a man her grandsons loved very much. a man who would be beyond proud of both of his grandchildren. >> i like to think that when they went to heaven, that he was there to greet them. and i like to think of that, i mean, i just imagine all that stuff, them seeing my mom, my dad, my husband. everybody when we all get to paradise. and i like to think that the boys are already in paradise. >> reporter: claire tells me that she and robert were married in november. they discussed him quitting the hot shots so he could spend more time at home. but she knew this job was so important to him and two weeks ago they went out to dinner together and she looked robert in the eyes and said you don't have to quit. you love this job too much. anderson? >> it's so devastating. you did such a great story of humanizing those two people. we're trying to learn more about the 19 as the days go by. up next, more deadly violence in egypt. tonight, the embattled president is defying the ultimatum issued by the military with the clock ticking down. the latest from cairo, ahead. ♪ [ male announcer ] the parking lot helps by letting us know who's coming. the carts keep everyone on the right track. the power tools introduce themselves. all the bits and bulbs keep themselves stocked. and the doors even handle the checkout so we can work on that thing that's stuck in the thing. 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[ female announcer ] today, cisco is connecting the internet of everything. wyuu1 0 >>> tonight, egypt's embattled president appears ready for a showdown with the military, saying he's willing to shed his own blood. the next 24 hours could be critical. he went on television, defiantly saying he's egypt's legitimate leader, chosen by the people in a free election and won't bow to the military's ultimatum. he called for it to be withdrawn. the military has given him until tomorrow night to make changes in his government that will satisfy opposition demands. our immediate protests today in egypt turned violent. at least 11 people were killed. in alexandria, supporters attacked each other. a lot to talk about tonight. bed wedeman is in cairo. i know it's loud where you are. president morsi saying he has a map date and has no intention to leave. that he's willing to shed his own blood. what is the reaction on the ground there? what's going on? >> reporter: the reaction here was very negative. after his speech, we heard a lot of boos. people very unhappy. this was very much a speech to his base, and they will feel very reinvigorated. it's been a rough couple of days for the muslim brotherhood. with these massive protests. but what the faithful in the brotherhood saw is that for the first time in egyptian history, an egyptian president basically standing up against the army, the most powerful institution in this country. we don't know how the army is going to act, but it raises the temperature quite a lot. there have been clashes in cairo. seven people dead. this city is bracing for perhaps a very difficult night. anderson? >> ben, who are the people behind you in tahrir square? are they people who didn't vote for morsi the first time? are they people who have become disen chanted with him while he's been in office? what exactly do they want and who are they? >> reporter: it's a mixture of people. let's not forget that 52% of the electorate, those who voted, voted for mohamed morsi in that election. that's why he won. but a lot of people were voting for him because they didn't want to vote for his opponent from the regime of hosni mubarak. others are old regime loyalists. i'll tell you something, there aren't a lot of revolutionaries that we saw in this square 2 1/2 years ago. these are people who are disaffected with morsi. they're angry over their falling standards of living, electricity cuts, fuel crisis, the rising crime in the streets of cairo. so it's a real mix of people. but definitely unhappiness is on the rise. one opinion poll published today said that 63% of those polled said they had seen their standard of living fall since president morsi came to power a year ago. >> if the army steps in and forces him from power, what happens then? essentially that's a military coup, isn't it? what would then occur? >> reporter: we shouldn't assume immediately that they would force morsi from power. that's a very delicate act to do, given that he was in fact legitimately elected. the worry is how the united states would react if that were the case. so certainly they may come up -- they may fudge a solution where he stays in power but they compel him one way or the other to bring in opposition figures to call for early elections, to redraft the constitution. there's a whole list of things that the army would like him to do, that people here would like him to do, but what we heard tonight in his speech is he's not about to do it. >> how much longer is his term, how much longer is he supposed to serve? >> reporter: he's supposed to serve for three more years. and in his speech this evening, he yet again said i made mistakes and i will try to correct them. he promised to open up a dialogue with the opposition. but those were sort of the side bars of the speech. the main part of the speech, addressing his base. as you said, ready to shed his blood to defend the legitimacy of the office he was elected to a year ago. >> the u.s. is calling on morsi and the opposition to resolve this situation politically. does that seem possible at this point? >> reporter: well, you know, the clock is ticking, anderson. it's just about 14 hours until that deadline runs out. what we may be seeing with all this mobilization of both the opposition and the brotherhood supporters is sort of a card game, where they're throwing their cards on the table saying this is what we can mobilize. >> we'll be watching it. ben wedeman, thank you very much. >>> coming up, the "ridicu-list." we'll be right back. hi, buddy! that's why the free wifi and hot breakfast are something to smile about. book a great getaway now and feel the hamptonality [ all ] who's new in the fridge! i help support bones... 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[ major nutrition ] nutrition in charge. what makes a sleep number what makes a sleep number store different? you walk into a conventional mattress store, it's really not about you. they say, "well, if you wanted a firm bed you can lie on one of those. if you want a soft bed you can lie on one of those." we provide the exact individualization that your body needs. welcome to the sleep number summer closeout. where you'll find great savings on the extraordinary sleep number bed, as we make room for our latest sleep innovations. this is your body there. you can see a little more pressure in the hips. take it up one notch. you get that moment where you go, "oh yeah" ... oh, yeah! ... and it's perfect. they had no idea that when they came to a sleep number store, we were going to diagnose their problems and help them sleep better. and now, save $500 to $800 on the closeout of our memory foam and iseries bed sets. plus, special financing-for one week only! once you experience it, there's no going back. don't invest in a mattress until you find your sleep number setting. but you won't find the sleep number bed in an ordinary mattress store. only at the sleep number store, where queen mattresses start at just $699. sleep number. comfort individualized. >>> time nor for the "ridicu-list." tonight, we're adding anyone out there who may doubt that cher is awesome. that's right, america, hold on to your wigs, i'm launching a pre-emptive strike against any cher skeptics because she is awesome. not because she's just a global icon that transcends generations and because she's back with a new single. oh, no. she's awesome because she puts up with me and my borderline creepy behavior. i know cher, not in a singing duet of "i got you babe" in her jacuzzi kind of bay, but i do kind of know her. and a few nights ago, she was on bravo "watch what happens live." what can i say. you try keeping a 46-year-old gay man away from cher. >> oh, my gosh, it's our doorbell. come in. it's anderson cooper, everybody. oh, my gosh. >> i literally returned down here. i got off the air at 11:00 and jumped in a car. i have to see cher. >> that's how awesome cher is, i show up, dressed more for a katie lang concert than a cher encounter, blathering and she was cool wit. so what did i do? did i calm down and sit there quietly like a normal person? bassing no. >> i watched c-span a lot and used to call in to c-span. the anchor would be on the air and there would be a voice saying okay, we're talking calls. and it would be like, i'm calling from malibu. and they would be like, is this cher? >> yeah. i did my cher impression in front of cher. seriously, i do not know what is wrong with me. but i will say in my own defense who else would have the nerve to do that? certainly not another cher superfan here at cnn who shall remain nameless. wolf blitzer. let it by known that i, anderson cooper, a part-time cher impersonator -- oh, man. man, nobody told me there would be a graphic. take that down, please. no, no! no! oh, man! but back to bravo the other night, even my terrible cher impression didn't turn cher against me. she didn't slap me across the face or snap me with her thong. but unfortunately that wasn't my only bizarre moment. >> my mom always wanted a girl, she had four boys. so she always called you her fantasy daughter. so i literally, when i was real young, thinking like, am i related to cher? is cher my sister? >> at that point, cher's security started to talk into their hands and motion toward me. i think she thought i was going to insist she live with me and braid her hair, which cher, if you're watching, i would totally do. so all you doubters out there, take note, please, god, don't show that grapc again. it's not just her talent and philanthropy, it's the fact that cher puts up with me, anderson cooper, creepy fan girl. that's what makes her so awesome and puts you on the "ridicu-list," if you're a doubter. that's it for us. thanks for watching. piers morgan starts now.
CNN
Jun 29, 2013 3:00am PDT
altercation before that single shot range out. cnn's martin savidge is outside the court hos. >> jonathan good is the witness you're talking a. he is i guess you could say the first eyewitness. there have been a number of witnesses who have spoken about what they heard. this was someone who really spoke about from what he said he saw. he said he was standing maybe x 15 feet away from where the struggle took place between martin and zimmerman inside that condo complex. he said he saw maybe somebody dressed in red or white on the bottom. we know that george zimmerman was wearing a red and black jacket. and that martin was wearing a dark hoodie. on the top of that came the issue of who was crying for help. and that is something that the defense has been keying on. because they believe whoever is crying for help is not the real aggressor in this case. so listen to the exchange on the stand about that. >> the voice screaming for help, however many times that you heard it, it was just one person's voice? >> when i heard it outside? yeah, i believe it was one person's voice, yes. >> and you now belie
CNN
Jul 2, 2013 1:00pm PDT
martin savidge who is insanford outside the courthouse. i believe the court has adjourned for today. what are we expecting for tomorrow if. >> they had to basically stop doing testimony today because one of the witnesses the prosecution wants to bring is a former professor for george zimmerman for a local community department, literally right next door to the justice system and we know george zimmerman was taking courses pertaining to criminal justice. as a result the prosecution wants to hear from this professor exactly what was it that george was learning and is it possible some of what he learned he may have been able to use to his advantage, especially when being interrogated by authorities? that issue is still being worked out because apparently that professor is on some trip where he's sporadically in and out of touch. and i would expect to hear from the medical person who conducted the autopsy on trayvon martin's body. we want to hear from the medical examiner because clearly the body of that young man is going to have a lot of evidence to bring in for both the defense and al
CNN
Jun 29, 2013 10:00am PDT
. nearly two dozen people have testify testified in the murder trial of george zimmerman. martin savidge is live for us in sanford where the jurors are getting the weekend off and they are sequestered, right, marty? >> that's correct, yeah, they would not be listening to any of what you and i are discussing. >> let's hope not. while these were the prosecution witnesses, many argued they seemed to help the defense. >> yeah, they did. there was one in particular, jonathan good and it's ironic because jonathan is, was, called by the state. the prosecution, but as it turns out, what he had to say really seemed the benefit the defense and he had a to say because he is really the first true eyewitness. he lives in the complex where this altercation took place, where trayvon martin was killed and he was in, within about 15 to 20 feet of the struggle that took place. he was able to identify who was on top and who was on the bottom. he was able to eventually identify who was screaming for help. and then he describes the kind of beating that he says was being delivered by trayvon martin against georg
CNN
Jun 27, 2013 1:00pm PDT
. >> let's go live now to martin savidge, who is outside the courtroom. the defense clearly wanted to paint this as someone who cannot be trusted. do you think it worked? and how were the jurors reacting to her testimony? >> a lot of times it looked like you had a clash of cultures, a generation divide taking place and then it seemed that there was a test of wills going on between don west and of course the young lady on the stand. they were able to not poke holes in her story, they were questioning essentially things that she had said in previous testimony before she took the stand and what she is now saying. but for the most part, on the stand she was strong. she stood by what she has said and that's essentially that she heard george zimmerman sounding like the aggressor. she said she heard the phone bump and then she heard that famous wet grass line, insinuating there was some sort of fight and she maintains that george zimmerman was on top because what she said is trayvon is saying "get off, get off." those are very powerful for the prosecution. as far as how the jury took this al
CNN
Jun 30, 2013 3:00pm PDT
they passed the regulation or passed at he built to be able to start drafting regulations. they are not doing it yet. especially because there is so much controversy surrounding the whole issue. it may be some time before we see it come here. >> all right. dr. devi, very interesting. we'll hear about this in the future. >> thank you. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> furious are headlines around the world that accuses our nsa bugging eu offices on both sides of the atlantic. >>> after the supreme court shot cowan marriage adistributions in california, opponents rushed to stop the weddings. >>> heat records smashed across the west. it's not over. we go live to death valley straight ahead. >>> a sight reminiscent of the arab spring. massive demonstrations in cairo that may be a powder keg waiting to explode. you're live in the cnn newsroom. i'm don lemon. we'll begin this hour with the alleged bugging of european union offices. according to a german justice minister, if the accusations are true, it is reminiscent of the cold war. european officials are angry and demanding answers. pentagon correspondent barbara starr is on the story for us. >> the german publication is reporting that the nsa, national security agency, spied on offices of the european union provoking outrage from those u.s. allies. the president of the european parliament issuing a very tough statement saying he wants answers from the u.s., and adding, "i am deeply worried and shocked about the allegations of u.s. authorities spying on the eu offices. if the allegations prove to be true, it would be an extremely serious matter." the paper is indicating its material came from edward snowden. here in washington, the office of the director of national intelligence issued a reply to the european saying, "the united states government will respond appropriately to the european union through our diplomatic channels. while we are not going to comment publically on specific alleged intelligence activities, as a matter of policy, we have made clear that the united states gasters foreign intelligence of the type gathered by all nations." so that's certainly far short of a denial that the u.s. spied on its allies. it should be noted that the u.s. assumes the allies spy on the u.s. barbara starr, cnn, washington. >> thank you very much. in the newspaper, which first broke the story of nsa spying activities is adding to today's revelati revelations. according to "the guardian," 38 embassies and missions across the world were targets of u.s. intelligence and techniques covered everything from planted bugs to data collection using specialized antenna. >>> as far as edward snowden, as far as we know, he is still in a transit zone at moscow airport. he is facing espionage charges in the u.s. which yanked its passport and asked other countries not to give him asylum. >> reporter: this is the view that may have flashed in front of edward snowden after touchdown at moscow's airport. through passport control, even though by then u.s. officials had revoked his travel documents. then perhaps snowden would have put the four laptops he was reportedly carrying through a scanner. what really happened next is a puzzle more complex than any in these airport magazines. there is no isolated transit lounge. like all other international passengers, the leaker would have had free run of terminals d, e and f, a maze of tax-free and coffee shops close to 3/4 mile long and 50 departure gates bustling with travelers. even so, it would be tough for one of america's most wanted men to stay hidden in plain sight. so we checked a handful of more private vip and first class lounges. no sign. has he perhaps donned a classic spy disguise, dark glasses and a russian hat? maybe even a t-shirt tribute to the first man in space. if snowden needs a stiff drink to steady his nerves on the lam, what better than a taste of what could be the next stop on his odyssey. the scandal snowden generated seems like a throwback to the cold war. every bit like these soviet mementos on sale. and so far, president obama reduced here to a smiling doll is floundering in efforts to hunt him down and bring him home. it's early in the morning and passengers thinned out. the question is, if snowden is not in this sprawling airport departure area, has someone let him slip out of one of many side doors like this? cnn, russia. >>> california's new wave of same-s.e.c. marriages survived a legal twist today. the supreme court rejected a request to stop california from issuing same-sex marriage licensees. the request came from proposition 8 backers who argue a 25-day waiting period for supreme court decisions to become final was being ignored. justice anthony kennedy acted on his own and rejected the request without consulting other justices. an historic supreme court ruling this week set the stage for california same-sex marriages to resume. another ruling struck down key parts of the defense of marriage act. rainbow flags were flying at guy pride parades around the world today with a special nod to historic rulings in the u.s. new york's parade honored the stone wall riots which launched the guy rights movement. san francisco is holding its biggest ever pride parade. about 1.5 million people are celebrating there. in toronto, thousands of people showed their pride, including kathleen wynn, ontario's first openly guy premier. >>> plenty of explosive and sometimes uncomfortable moments in the george zimmerman trial. 22 witnesses took the stand, providing crucial testimony for the six female jurors who will eventually determine zimmerman's fate. martin savidge outside the courthouse in sanford, florida, now. you've been there all week. what is the defining moment? do you think there was a defining moment going on to jurors? >> reporter: i thought about that question a lot. i don't know if i could say there is a defining moment. there have been defining moments. we had the testimony that came from rachel jaentil. they heard what she was saying trayvon martin was seeing and going through. there were others who thought the testimony begin on friday, jonathan goode, that he was a key witness, eyewitness 15 to 20 feet away from the struggle these two were having, the teenager and george zimmerman. he gave a remarkable account. there is more yet to come in what could be some dramatic testimony, including perhaps the parents of trayvon martin taking the stand and the question everybody wants to know is will george zimmerman take the stand? i think he would like to. i think his attorneys would say, well, wait a minute here. there is a strategy and reason why we might not want you to take the stand. week one turned out to have a lot more twists and turns. many people including those who cover this case anticipated. that only makes you say, boy, week two could have a great deal more. >> absolutely what about the statements from zimmerman to police in the days following the shooting? the written statements, there is audio and that video reenactment we've all seen and watched so many times on television. are those expected to come into court this week? >> i believe they are. it's going to be up to the prosecution to introduce them. that remains to be seen. again, there is a strategy to this. once evidence is introduced, you also have to understand you may be able to use it, meaning the state can use it, but then the defense may be able to use it to their advantage. that's why we'll have to see. there are a number of events that are already in there. for instance, the call that george zimmerman makes to the nonemergency line. that's been introduced. that's going to be crucial because that weighs to the time line here. you actually hear what's going on. the reenactment. you could then try to compare the two. how does the reenactment compare to that telephone call he makes? do they match up or does it seem like georges changing his story for his benefit that's what i think the state is going to try to show, is that his story does not always hold up and doesn't hold up with the reality of what we know. >> okay. marty, you've been in that courtroom. i just have to say this. looking at that video of him showing police what happened on the night of trayvon martin's death, and there it is right there. looking at him there, he is a fairly thin man. in the courtroom, he has gained over 100 pounds. clearly, this has been stressful on him. we are watching on television cameras on the television. can you feel it? can you see it in his face? is there fear there? what's going on? >> i'm not an expert at body language and i can't tell you what is going on inside his head. what i noticed, and this is just me as an observer in the courtroom and watching. initially when this trial began, george zimmerman was there. i have noted as it progressed, especially toward the end of the week, he's become more active in what is happening inside that courtroom. he is paying closer attention. there are times people thought he was nodding off. we don't see that now. he's taking down notes and writing. i've seen him interact with the attorneys, his defense attorneys while they are questioning somebody. he seems to be offering advice or offering some insight or maybe suggesting even a question. i don't know. his action within the case appears to be more confident. once you take away from that -- i'm not going to be the one to make the measure. >> i notesed that as an observer outside the courtroom, same thing. thank you, martin. appreciate it. >>> president barack obama is in south africa. it's an emotional visit. he stood where nelson mandela had been imprisoned for many years. the anti-apartheid icon wasn't with him. he remains hospitalized. 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"dedication: that's the real walmart" >>> president obama will be in tanzania tomorrow, the third and final leg of his week-long trip to fix. he wrapped up his tour today with a visit to the prison where nelson mandela was held for many years. it was quite emotional with the ailing anti-apartheid icon still in critical condition in the hospital. the president pledged $7 billion to combat frequent power blackouts in parts of africa. >>> it's time to talk politics and the impact of this week's big supreme court decisions. e.d. hill is back with us. she is in austin, texas. and maria cardona is in washington. she is a democratic strategist. good to see both of you. >> nice to see you, don. >> let's start with the two rulings on same-sex marriage. in a pair of 5-4 votes, the court struck down the 1996 defensive marriage act and refused to rule on california's proposition 8 making it the 13th state to allow same-sex marriages. i had been wanting to talk to conservatives about this on the air, but to get -- do you think the courts made the right calls? >> i don't know if i'm conservative enough for you. i believe it is a states rights issue. i think it was wise for them not to get involved in california. california just didn't follow the necessary protocol to be able to follow the path they wanted to. that's the issue. i do think that was appropriate. i also happen to be a pretty fair-minded person, i think. honestly, i go back and forth. i'm not sure i made up my mind where i stand on homosexual marriage, guy marriage rights, but i do believe in fairness. it's hard to argue against what they decided in terms of the federal government. >> would you say you' ar'ryou'r involving on this issue? >> you've i got a lot of people. it was with bipartisan -- with the states where this has passed, it's continuing to increase. i think we've got 30% of the nation's adults now live in states where they can, if they choose to, be married. whether they are heterosexual or homosexual. i do believe we are seeing the tide. it is moving in one direction. i don't know if it's necessarily a matter of time till it's all that way, but it certainly has been moving in one direction. >> okay. maria, i don't know if we need to discuss it. we talked about how you feel about this. you think it's a civil right and i imagine you think the courts ruled correctly. >> absolutely. they did the right thing. >> let's move on. i want to zero in on the opinions that justice kennedy wrote. the federal statute is invalid. for no legitimate purpose overcomes the purpose and effect to disparage and injure those who sought to protect in personhood and dignity. his point is laws banning guy marriage were designed to harm guy and lesbian couples. justice scalia fired back, in the majority's telling, this story is black and white. hate your neighbor or come along with us. the truth is more complicated. and the conservative leader ralph reed makes a similar argument. >> because somebody wants to affirm the institution of marriage that they are intolerant, by that argument, barack obama was intolerant 14 months ago. by that argument, 342 members of the house, 85 members of the senate, including by the way, joe biden, harry reid, pat leahy who all voted for this law, and bill clinton who signed it into law were intolerant and motivated by an animus and hatred for guys. >> are laws banning same-sex marriage motivated to harm guys and lesbian? >> i think they are motivated by a desire to protect something that the conservatives and others who believe that guys and lebs should not have the right to be married in the same way that a man and woman do, i think these laws were designed to protect, and again i don't think it's correct, but to protect what they believe is sacrosanct between a man and a woman. now, to me that gets to the religious aspect of this. from a civil rights perspective, this is why i think that the decision was correct. because i do think by giving them the protection through the law, you're also denying 10% of the population the same rights and benefits and privileges that a man and a woman who marry are able to get. that inherently is wrong. and goes against american values. that is what i think the supreme court was trying to correct. >> here what is i'm trying to figure out. >> i do agree -- >> go ahead, e.d. >> can i interject? i do believe a lot of people try to put this into a very personal argument. that you are evil if you don't agree with guy marriage. that you hate people. that there is something more personal about that. maria's got it right. people have very different views for a multitude of reasons. maybe they are just focused on benefits. maybe they are focused on the religious aspects of it. it is a variety of things. it is not black and white. it is very difficult. that is why i believe it is best left at the states. that opens up a whole other can of worms. what happens when you're married in california and you move to texas? what laws are the ones that supercede the other? you file a federal tax return joint and you file the state tax return separate? we've got to figure this one out. i think this is probably the reason we elect people to go to washington and do some work. these are the hard choices they always pass off. >> all right. thank you, guys. appreciate it. i enjoyed that talk. wish we had more time to talk about it. thank you. >>> another big story today, the excessive heat has a strangle hold on the west. temperatures are rising. we want to death valley where the temperature is a whopping 127 degrees. we'll get to her after the break. you had your trusty thermostat earlier, thermometer earlier. what is it now? >> reporter: all right, don. i have multiple things to show you here. this is my trusty thermometer here. it's reading above 130 degrees. obviously, that is not the official temperature out here, but it's just been cooking in the sun. another thing i want to show you though is this actually measures the ground temperature. if i point it there and get a reading for you. hold on. it's closer to about 145 degrees. that gives you a point of just how awful it is standing out here in this heat. your issues are just burning. let's bring in someone here. peter, you actually decided to come out here because you wanted to be part of potential history? >> yeah. we are desert adventurers and all. we would never miss the hottest temperature than ever. it's been 100 years. it's a good time to break that record. >> i've got to tell you, take a look at this crew here. all these people have come to this area, don. this is a basin. it's below sea level. some 282 feet below sea level. people here think the temperature is going to be hotter here than in furnace creek. they gathered here and are trying to take the temperature themselves in hopes of reaching that level. we'll see. >> tory, people talk to you when you're off camera. what are they backing up to you saying, oh, my gosh, i can't believe, it's like hell it's so hot here? >> there is a mixture of things. people say this is great, i never felt heat like this. they've probably only been outside a few minutes. others are saying they never felt anything like this. they are from so many different countries. trying to make sure they stay safe, as well. the biggest thing is all these people want someone to take the official measurement at this spot because they think it's hotter here than in furnace creek. >> yeah. this is me sending a note to the boss saying you should do live shots from the beach next week, all right? you earned your stripes. you've taken one for the team. >> as long as the beach is cool. >> yes. thank you, tory. appreciate it. >>> how long will these unbelievable temperatures last? with storms threatening the rest of the country? 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[ male announcer ] now get 50% off brake pads and shoes at meineke. -free is good. -free is very good. for a store near you go to benjaminmoore.com/bayarea. >>> will tomorrow bring much-needed relief to the southwest? we want to go to the cnn weather center and jennifer delgado live in the weather center. i would imagine where tory is it's air conditioning appreciation day. >> absolutely. i can tell you honestly, i am totally not jealous of her live shot and going out on that story. it is brutally hot in parts of the southwest. look at some of these numbers from yesterday, don. for las vegas, new record, 115. 117 was the record back in 2005. death valley 128. the all-time record for the warmest spot on earth 134 degrees in death valley. getting very close to that with temperatures once again right near 130 degrees. look at the numbers right now. as you said, air conditioners are working in overdrive. imagine a lot of people are in the movies trying to get relief from the head. needles 118. 112 in phoenix. the heat is going to continue tomorrow. even potentially some of these areas through wednesday. that's why we have these excessive heat warnings in place. anywhere you are seeing in the pink shading, this is going to last until tuesday. now we add in the pacific northwest. they are going to deal with the heat. this bubble of warm air is going to be lifting up towards north. our friends in canada will be dealing with this extreme heat as we go through the next couple of days. in the east coastline, it's going to be cool and rainy for the next several days as this ridge of high pressure is really going to be stalled out. we are not going to see any relief any time soon. you may be asking, hey, we have the holidays coming up. how is this going to affect the fireworks? we have a drought, we have heat wave over in the west. that means a lot of fireworks are going to be canceled there. we have rain in the east. that means we won't have a lot of displays. that includes the east coast. central part of the u.s. will be the right spot, even cool. >> it's all bad news. >> i'm not all bad news. i gave you a bright spot, the midwest. >> general if you are, you're fired. >> i probably am. >> thank you. appreciate it. >>> what can you expect from the week ahead and politics, wall street, the world of entertainment? we've got your primer next. all business purchases. so you can capture your receipts, and manage them online with jot, the latest app from ink. so you can spend less time doing paperwork. and more time doing paperwork. ink from chase. so you can. what makes a sleep number what makes a sleep number store different? you walk into a conventional mattress store, it's really not about you. they say, "well, if you wanted a firm bed you can lie on one of those. if you want a soft bed you can lie on one of those." we provide the exact individualization that your body needs. welcome to the sleep number summer closeout. where you'll find great savings on the extraordinary sleep number bed, as we make room for our latest sleep innovations. this is your body there. you can see a little more pressure in the hips. take it up one notch. you get that moment where you go, "oh yeah" ... oh, yeah! ... and it's perfect. they had no idea that when they came to a sleep number store, we were going to diagnose their problems and help them sleep better. and now, save $500 to $800 on the closeout of our memory foam and iseries bed sets. plus, special financing-for one week only! once you experience it, there's no going back. don't invest in a mattress until you find your sleep number setting. but you won't find the sleep number bed in an ordinary mattress store. only at the sleep number store, where queen mattresses start at just $699. sleep number. comfort individualized. >>> everything has a steady trend upwards as far as the sales price. also competition for buyers. >> tan works for red fin until recently the ceo glenn kellman was -- >> scared to death. was probably how i felt a year ago. we were worried about the market. it had been many years since we had seen a rally. now this year, we feel very confident. >> confident because home prices in 20 targeted cities over the past year rose about 12%. in some markets by even more. in atlanta, prices shot up almost 21%. in las vegas, more than 22%. in san francisco, nearly 24%. the general slow improvement of the economy and the re-emergeians of investors are credited making sellers happy. >> on the buyers' side, it's a different story. >> in the hottest markets, buyers who were calling the shots a few months ago find themselves in bidding wars for the most desirable properties. still, the journey to a full recovery could yet see road blocks and it will certainly take time. even with the upward trend, one study found the average home value now is about where it was in 2004. tom foreman, cnn, washington. >>> at the box office this week, monsters university schooled schooled its competition the second week in a row. it pulled in more than $46 million. second place sandra bullock and melissa america carty in "the heat." "man of steel" was fifth. let me give you a preview of the other big stories this week from the cnn political desk to wall street to hollywood. our correspondents tell you what you need to know. >> the cnn political desk. illegal immigration will be a topic of conversation this week as members of congress head back to their home states and districts. >> a sweeping immigration reform bill faces an uncertain future in the house. texas governor rick perry's calling state law makers back to special session this week to try and pass a controversial bill to ban nearly all abortions after 20 weeks. >>> i'm poppy harlow in new york. we'll get a key manufacturing reading. they are important indicators of people's willingness to spend in this economic environment. u.s. markets close at 1:00 eastern wednesday ahead of the fourth of july holiday. they are closed all day on thursday, then when markets reopen here in the u.s. on friday, we'll get that all-important monthly jobs report. we'll see how many jobs were added in june and we'll see if unemployment moved up or down from the current 7.6%. we'll track it all for you on cnn money. >> here is what we are watching this week. i'll bring all the best moments from the b.e.t. awards. the raw reaction to controversial anna nicole smith and the movie portraying her. "showbiz tonight" monday through thursday at 11:00 p.m. >>> thank you very much. that whooshing sound is congress about to miss another deadline. this time it's going to hit college kids and parents helping pay their education. some student loan rates are about to skyrocket. >>> a pilot tried to keep the chopper afloat. the pilot and four tourists were treated for minor injuries. >>> the cost of a college education will skyrocket for thousands of students tomorrow because interest rates on certain student loans are set to double. cnn's business correspondent zain asher explains what this could mean for america's future grads. >> i'm almost $60,000 in debt which will affect my ability to have a mortgage and affect my ability to have a student and helped them. >> rachael studied drama but skyrocketing tuition forced her to drop out. >> we are asking too much of our college students and we are narrowing and narrowing the field of who can be a college student in the country. >> reporter: american college grads are more than $1 trillion in collective student loans. as tuition costs continue to soar, rising interest rates could be their next headache. interest rates or subsidized loans was fixed at 3.4%. now that congress hasn't intervened, that rate is scheduled to double. >> i think doubling the rate to 6.8% would increase default rates. the students receiving the subsidized loans are from the lowest income brackets. >> reporter: while some law makers want to keep the rates at the lower 3.4% temporarily, others say student loan rates should be allowed to fluctuate. >> i think there will be some kind of adjustment. i don't know if they'll go to a variable rate loan. they may kick the can down the road and say we'll revisit it another year later. >> higher rates could be a revenue booster for government generating $36 billion this year when congress is scrambling for new sources of cash. it could cost students in more than $5,000 loan repayments. >> the president and mrs. obama just finished paying off their student loans. the fact they are 40 years old paying off student loan debts could be scary. we could be 50 or 60 without having paid off our student loans. >> politicians have to look beyond their own self-interest. college students are counting on them. >> zain asher, cnn, new york. >>> a sight reminiscent of the arab spring. massive demonstrations in cairo right now. live pictures of tahrir square. that may be a powder keg waiting to explode. all this produce from walmart and secretly served it up in the heart of peach country. it's a fresh-over. we want you to eat some peaches and tell us what you think. they're really juicy. it must have just come from the farm. this right here is ideal for me. walmart works directly with growers to get you the best quality produce they've ever had. what would you do if i told you all this produce is from walmart? wow! is it really? (laughter) find fresh peaches and all your quality produce. backed by our 100% money back guarantee. walmart. >>> deadly protests rocking egypt today. >>> you're looking at live pictures right now. at least three people killed and 174 injured in protests held exactly one year after egypt's first democratically elected president came to power. critics and supporters of president mohammed morsi hit the streets clashing in some areas. a government-run newspaper said egypt is on the brink of a volcano. >>> earlier this year there was a lot of long overdue conversation about guns in this country. much of that has faded away, unfortunately. gun ownership is far from fading away. tonight on "inside man" we step behind the gun counter to find out who is selling, who is buying and why. >> what are you looking for? >> a little .38, a concealed job for the wife. >> pleasure meeting you. >> business is booming at ssg. just in the day i worked there, i saw husbands, hunters and whole families come in to purchase guns for all kinds of different reasons. >> when you're carrying concealed, it's about what i can do to stay alive and know when not to fire. >> reporter: they were afraid tighter gun control legislation was coming. >> people who never owned a gun think things will change. >> reporter: it's a fear-driven market. >> in the middle of the night when somebody screams, get out movie house, i've got a gun and they rack a shotgun, next thing you hear is going down the hall away from you. >> i've been looking for this a while? >> since obama got elected. making sure i get one before i can't get one. that's exactly what i'm looking for. >> sold. >> all you need is two forms of i.d. with the same name and address and a credit card or money. >> you don't need to ask for permission? >> you all right. >> catch the rest of this all new "inside man" 10:00 eastern on cnn. >>> a lot has been written about the relationship with the nfl and guns. that relationship soured more this week. >>> there's been a lot of attention on the arrest of former new england patriot aaron hernandez on murder charges. friday there was yet another incident involving an nfl player and guns. indianapolis colts player joe e lefage was arrested with a concealed weapon after a trafb stop. >> aaron hernandez' arrest on murder charges is the latest brush with the law associated with nfl players. this picture may look like a team's roster, but it actually shows more than two dozen players arrested for various crimes ranging from dui to misdemeanor assault over the past yore, according to the nfl. >> we don't know if there are convictions in any of these arrests. secondly, it's still a relatively small percent of all nfl players. >> the percentage may be small, but the arrests attract a spotlight. when police charged rookie line backer walcott with attempted murder beating a man outside a new jersey club this week. they pled not guilty, walcott and hernandez both had previous encounters with the law. >> the league find themselves in situations like this. not the least is at the team level, team player personnel executives looking past a player's very public history, especially in the case of aaron hernandez for the sake of what they can do for the team on the field. >> so we'll open it up for questions. >> nfl commissioner roger goodell toughened the conduct policy six years ago making it easier to sanction players for infractions. goodell declined our request for an interview but a spokesman told cnn the average arrest rate per year of nfl players is consistently lower than the general population. >> a few players can make the whole league look a certain way. >> cleveland browns safety t.j. ward says he has not been in trouble, but understands how one arrest can tarnish the brand. >> a couple of issues can make the whole league look a certain way. it's all about perception, especially in our society. it's all about what people perceive. >> reporter: consider this, nielsen ratings for the past nfl season were the highest in a decade, despite everything, fans keep watching. >> i made the decision a long time ago to respect athletes for their performance on the field more so than for their behavior off the field. >> i love football. i'll probably be following, but we'll see. >> jason carroll, cnn, new york. >>> terence ward joins me from new york. he's a columnist for mlb.com. a sports contributor to cnn.com. aaron hernandez was on his way, lucrative career in the nfl, growing family, a luxury home. $40 million contract. now he is accused of murder. i want you to look at this photo of hernandez. no word on when this was taken, although it's believed to be some time in the recent past. hardly the first athlete to own a gun. a random player survey by "usa today," it's unscientific and estimated 75% of nfl players are gun owners. you cover pro athletes on and off the field. do you believe that number? >> easily. professional athletes in general, certainly in the nfl. i want to tell you how bad it is, don. you just showed a graphic that said 28 nfl players have been arrested since the end of the super bowl in february. actually, that figure has gone up to 29, as we continue to go on. it gets worse and worse. aaron hernandez situation, of course, is horrific. he also will be charged, it looks like with a double murder from last year. then a few days ago you had a rookie line backer for the cleveland browns who was just arrested for attempted murder. this just goes on and on. it doesn't look like there is any end in sight. >> makes you wonder what happened to the good old days or maybe we are romanticizing the good old days. >> you had rae carruth who blotted to kill his pregnant girlfriend. more than 30 years back when dinosaurs roamed the earth, i covered the oakland raiders for the "san francisco examiner." there was no internet there was no 24 hour news channels, and virtually no drug tests. it's like the wild, wild west. the wildest were the raiders i covered. i bring that up. they had a defensive lineman named john matuzack who had the biggest lincoln continental. at all times he carried a machete and magnum in the car. that was 30 something years ago. >> okay. all right. and there were typewriters back then, too. >> right. >> what about reports aaron hernandez kept his ties to guys from the old neighborhood? that's a familiar story, right? a guy from a tough background makes it to the big time, but then he can't turn his back on his old friends who might be bad influences. what are you brand-new? what about that? >> let's go to the positive here. this is where you've got to like the atlanta falcons. atlanta falcons have a standout wide receiver named roddy white who never theless the first few years in the league he was a knuckle head. in 2009, the falcons said we want to sign this guy to a big contract, but they told him you've got to get rid of your more than questionable friends before we do this. some guys from south carolina, about three or four of them. to roddy's credit, he got rid of them. to this day four years later, not only is he a great wide receiver, but he's a boy scout. it can work out. >> hernandez' college days are getting new scrutiny. he was the best tight end in the 2010 draft, but he wasn't taken until the fourth round. teams were supposedly afraid of his off the field trouble, so to speak. is there something more that teams or the league can do to help these guys? i remember, i have to say you were talking about the atlanta falcons. i remember the first time i went to do something with the atlanta falcons. they were teaching their players how to keep their money, how not to spend all their money and how to be good citizens. is there something these guys aren't doing? >> well, there is something they can do more. they need to expand it away from just rookies, include everybody. do it every year for everybody. maybe do about two or three times a year. here is the big thing, it's a violent sport and there is no way they can have a test on whether or not a guy is going to be a murderer or not. >> thank you, terence. appreciate it. >>> furious, that's how headlines around the world describe the european union reaction to reports the nsa was bugging eu offices. \s 7pm >>> officials in europe did demanding answers after it was reported they bugged the european union offices and hacked computers. a german justice said it was reminiscent of a cold war. the revelations came from documents released by nsa leaker edward snowden. >>> get ready for another day of oppressive heat out west tomorrow. we've seen records broken. phoenix 119. las vegas 115. the heat have even killed a las vegas man. temperatures teetering a second day at 127 degrees in death valley, california. >>> i'm don lemon in new york. "antho "anthony bourdain, parts unknown" begins now. >>> it used to be you grew up to be a doctor, a lawyer, an engineer. there were specific sets of rules and expectations. >> are you asking me to be in a porno? >> thanks some remarkably bad koreans though, things are beginning to change. >> i went to one year lawsuit and walked out. >> any final advice for someone about to marry a korean woman? the answer beings don't do it.
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Jun 27, 2013 11:00pm PDT
>>> "outfront" next, president more on the attitude adjustment and all the other big developments tonight from martin savidge. >> reporter: round two of the clash in the courtroom between the star witness and veteran defense attorney. it started out nice enough, rachel jeantel seemed to have adopted a more respectful tone. >> yes, sir. >> reporter: but it wasn't long before her yes, sirs seemed to take on a sharper edge. >> yes, sir. >> reporter: defense attorney don west was out to discredit her testimony that george zimmerman was the aggressor and pointed to numerous changes in her story in previous accounts including a letter to trayvon's mother, describing what she heard. in it, she left out trayvon's derogatory racial language. >> you specifically chose not to tell ms. fulton that's what trayvon said. >> no. >> because you thought it would hurt her feelings, didn't you? >> no. >> you didn't think that would bother her, if you said that her son described the man that was following him in a car on the phone -- >> i didn't think. >> was a creepy ass cracker. >> i did not think that was important. >> not important enough to put in the letter. >> no. >> and not important enough to tell her. >> no. >> reporter: she said martin sounded tired on the phone like he was running but she said he was whispering because the teen was waiting to ambush zimmerman, something she denied. >> he got close to trayvon, yes, sir. >> and you don't know whether the man was approaching trayvon at that point and getting closer or whether trayvon was approaching the man and getting closer? >> trayvon would have told me he'll call me back, sir, if he was going to approach him, sir. >> so you're assuming that trayvon didn't approach the man because he would have told you if he was going to confront the guy, he would call you back when it was over? >> yes, sir. >> reporter: then west went after what could be the most damaging part of her testimony for the defense. jeantel said over the phone she heard a bump and martin say get off get off to zimmerman. >> so the last thing you heard was a noise like something hitting somebody. >> that trayvon got hit. trayvon got hit. >> you don't know that, do you? >> no, sir. >> you don't know that trayvon got hit -- >> he -- >> you didn't know that trayvon at that moment take his fist and drive it in george zimmerman's face, do you? >> please lower your voice. >> do you? >> no, sir. >> at mid afternoon as she left the witness stand, the judge reminded her that she could be called back. there may be many opinions about whether she helped or hurt the prosecution. in the end, the only ones that really matter are the six opinions in the jury box. >> martin joins us now. we heard some of what rachel jeantel said and who was at the initial interviews when she spoke to police. why was that so important? >> reporter: this is something the defense is trying to bring up, there was a very close relationship between the prosecution and trayvon martin's family, but also, their attorney benjamin crump. in fact, when the initial interview took place with authorities, that young lady was sitting in the home of trayvon martin's mother and seated next to her when she gave that first testimony was sabrina, trayvon martin's mother. so they are trying to imply that her testimony could have actually been encouraged or somehow interfered with just by having trayvon's mother right next to her. >> another witness called is jenna lower. she made one of the 911 calls. jurors heard her call, the yelling and the gunshots. what did she say that was so important? >> that's the thing, what she had to say really was not so important. she didn't bring such dynamic or anything new, but of course her call everybody knows. if she hadn't made the call at the seem she did, you never could have caught the gunshot and the screams that are at the center of such a huge debate in this case. it allowed for her call to be introduced, but she really didn't bring too much. >> thanks very much. we'll take a more look at rachel jeantel's demeanor and the attempt for the prosecution's star witness, let's remember that, she was the star witness. as you saw in martin's report, they tried to use her to flip the prosecution's racial narrative on its head trying to suggest the victim, trayvon martin, was racist, take a look. >> what is one thing about what trayvon martin told you that made you think this was racial? >> describing the person. >> pardon me? >> describing the person -- >> i just didn't -- >> describing the person that was watching him and following him. >> i see. >> sir. >> and that's because he described him as a creepy ass cracker? >> yes. >> so it was racial, but it was because trayvon martin put race in this? >> no. >> you don't think that's a racial comment? >> no. >> you don't think that creepy ass cracker is a racial comment? >> no. >> let's dig deeper with the team of legal pros. sunny hostin, and criminal defense attorney danny savios. sunny, what do you think of those comments? the defense spent a lot of time on the subject of race today with rachel jeantel implying it was trayvon martin that put race into the discussion by using that term. >> that didn't make a lot of sense to me given the fact the defense fought so hard from keeping the prosecution from saying racial profiling and they were victorious in that. so they have taken what was the elephant in the room and painted it bright pink and everyone is talking about it. it didn't make a lot of sense to me strategically. what didn't work is okay, fine, those were trayvon martin's words. they were disparaging and unkind words, but he used it as a description for george zimmerman. she just repeated what trayvon martin said and since they weren't kind words it made her more credible because she's not trying to sugar coat anything. she's not trying to make him sound better. she's not saying he side a white gentleman was following me. she used his words and made her more credible. >> do you think it made her credible using the word cracker is not a racial team? >> yeah, and that's something i've been thinking about. i grew up in the northeast. it wasn't a term i was familiar with at all. for her she described it not as racial epithet but a descriptive term. >> he was a cracker -- what are you -- >> yeah, she used it as a descriptor -- >> are you actually saying it makes her more credible because she accurately described him as a cracker? is that where you're going with that? >> no, you're mischaracterizing what i said. what i said, i said because she's not trying to sugar coat what trayvon martin said. >> the argument -- her argument that it's not a racial term, does that matter? does the jury care? >> why, and here's why. not so much because she used a racist term but because we're talking about getting a glimpse into trayvon martin's mind and the jury is all about relatability. we can talk about taking it easy on a young witness. we can talk about socioeconomics, racism, classism. at the end of the day, jurors look for relatability. who do i relate to? when you relate to someone, you find them credible. it has nothing to do with an opinion one race is better than the other. it has nothing to do with that. it has to do when somebody talks, are they someone i can relate to? the jurors will ask is this somebody at a cocktail party, would i use that language? do i view the word cracker the way this person views it? can i relate to this person? >> sunny, your argument is that she is authentically being herself, and not trying to pretend to be something that she's not and using terms danny would not use at a cocktail party, you're actually saying that makes her relatable. >> it makes her relatable because she used the terms martin used with her. she could have very easily did what she did when she wrote the letter to sabrina fulton. she left that out. on the witness stand, she says what trayvon told her. if she wanted to make trayvon look like an angel or wanted to make trayvon look a certain way, if she thought that was going to be harmful, she could have said that trayvon told me that there was a white gentleman following him. but no, she used that term. >> hold on -- >> and i think a juror will find that more credible. >> sunny, you're making a good point she was sugar coating it we know from cross-examination, sugarcoating is what she said in her original statement, she left out -- she just called the guy creepy. she said trayvon called the guy creepy and later on she left out "cracker" originally because she wanted to sugarcoat it. she didn't want trayvon's mom have to hear the language of "cracker." >> i want to play a small part of this. >> sunny, who was calling for help is a huge point of convention. you were in the court today. did either side sway the jury as to who was heard on that call? >> no, i don't think so. i think that the only thing that is important at this point in the trial is that now that evidence is in front of the jury. we know the voice experts aren't going to testify. what we do know is that someone from trayvon martin's family, if not one person, perhaps more. they're going to get on the witness stand and identify the voices -- the cries as coming from him. i suspect that someone from george zimmerman's family in the defense case will also come forward and say this is george zimmerman's voice. many of the witnesses said it sounded like a boy's voice, like a young person's voice. it's going to be up to the jury to decide. i think the ground work has been laid now, anderson, for a showdown in the courtroom between the families. and that's going to be a fascinating thing to watch. >> sunny, danny, appreciate it. what do you think about the trial of what you saw today? we'll return to the witness rachel jeantel and get a closer look at who she is. >>> later, former nfl star aaron hernandez is charged with first degree murder, you know that. but he's also being investigated in connection with another case, a double homicide. details on that ahead. the kyocera torque lets you hear and be heard even in stupid loud places. to prove it, we set up our call center right here... 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[ laughs ] i know where i'm going to be shopping for strawberries now. find fresh berries and all your quality produce backed by our money back guarantee. walmart. >>> welcome back. every big trial these days seems to have one witness that becomes something of a sensation. in this trial, as millions have seen, that witness is trayvon martin's friend rachel jeantel. she's been like the case itself, polarizing. today she seemed to be at times less combative, not always as you see in this exchange with don west that starts with yes, sir but builds to something stronger. take a look. >> he told me the dude was close to him. >> right, at that point he decided to approach this man and say why are you following me? >> yes, sir. >> and he could have just run home -- >> he was already by his house. he told me. >> of course, you don't know if he was telling you the truth of not. >> why he need to lie about that, sir? >> maybe if he decided to assault george zimmerman, he didn't want you to know that. >> that's real retarded, sir. >> i'm sorry? >> that's real retarded to do that, sir. if you don't know the person, why risk it? trayvon did not know him. >> rachel jeantel today, her second day in the spotlight. her performance on the stand more polished than yesterday but still raising eyebrows and as randi kaye reports, none of that attention is welcome. >> reporter: rachel jeantel never wanted any of this, no media glare, no attention, and no tough questions about her phone call with trayvon martin moments before he was shot. that may be why she lied about her age. >> did you say that you were 16 so that you could try to maintain more privacy? >> yes. >> so you wanted to make yourself seem like a minor, so that maybe there wouldn't be as much public disclosure as if you said your true age of 18? >> yes. >> reporter: today rachel jeantel is 19, and her life story from what we can piece together is more exposed than she had ever dreamed. she attended miami norland senior high school and according to facebook took classes in criminal justice at miami university, though the school says they have no record. she's from north miami where she says her and trayvon martin had met in elementary school. why do we care so much who this woman is? because her testimony on what trayvon told her the night he died could make or break the case. if what she says is true, trayvon martin was scared and trying to get away from a man, a man who later turned out to be george zimmerman. but jeantel may have some credibility issues. she's already been caught lying about her age and about her reason for not attending trayvon's funeral. and then there is her vanishing postings on twitter. according to the smoking gun, tweets referring to trayvon and the case were removed just hours before her testimony. like this one from june 21st. 16 months later, wow, i need a drink. jeantel had also tweeted about having quote jackass lawyers on my ass. it's unclear which lawyers she's referring to but certainly has held her own with zimmerman's attorneys in court. she took some heat from the defense for this audio interview she gave the martin family attorney early on in the investigation. >> what did you hear? >> get off, some stuff. >> you heard get off? >> like look, get off. >> reporter: watch how she puts defense lawyer don west on his heels in court about delaying his interview with her. >> when you did not want to interview me that friday. >> i didn't want to interview you? >> well -- >> we didn't -- we didn't have an interview, did we? >> no, but we agreed to that friday. >> i'm sorry that you were inconvenienced but we did not have the interview on friday because of scheduling issues, do you agree with that? >> you should have picked me up on thursday. >> rachel jeantel was hoping to put this all behind her with this simple handwritten letter to trayvon's mother, a friend helped her write it. she sent it about a month after his death and in it explains what she remembers from that night. the man started getting closer, then trayvon turned around and said why are you following me? then i heard him fall. then the phone hung up. when the defense asked her to read the letter in court she said she couldn't read cursive handwriting and later explained she's of haitian descent and grew up speaking spanish. on her facebook monday, two days before her testimony began she posted i know i have a lot of explain to do. randi kaye, cnn, atlanta. >> attorney darrell parks and his partner ben crump have been handling the legal matters for the martin family. he joins us live. as the martin family attorney, how do you think rachel's testimony went today? >> i think rachel's team was great, anderson. she stood fast. her testimony was consistent, and as you see, she through various attempts to impeach her, held her own. >> she seemed less combative in her testimony today than yesterday. did you or your colleagues prepare her for today's testimony or give her advice on what to do differently? >> no, she has her own counsel in this case. however, remember, yesterday she came at the latter part of the court day. so she was tired and most people sitting in court were tired and we went fairly late. so i believe that she was just tired. obviously, once she was given the chance to rest overnight, came back and she was a great witness. she was very respectful to the court and gave very precise answers. >> so you're saying neither you or mr. crump gave her advice about what to do differently today on the stand? >> no, as a matter of fact, i believe she was in the custody of the agents. we had no access to her whatsoever. >> do you feel the defense attorney don west was too harsh with her today? >> well, i think mr. west's presentation spoke for itself. you know, i try to make sure i don't criticize lawyers and their styles, but i think -- i don't believe mr. west is really connected with the jury but we'll see from their verdict. >> you gave a press conference after court today where you said the martin family wanted to make it clear that quote race was not a part of this process, but a lot of the prosecution's opening statement is about george zimmerman profiling trayvon martin. >> well, anderson, i think you have to distinguish that when you have a situation where we see that george zimmerman is talking in the 911 tape and describing what he was seeing in trayvon martin and calling him suspicious. we don't believe the focus is really race. additionally, the charge he is facing has nothing to do with race. >> so you don't believe that george zimmerman felt trayvon martin was suspicious because he was african-american? >> no, i think he saw a person who had a hoodie on, who was walking. he didn't know who he was. it was a rainy night. it was dark, so he thought that maybe he was seeing some of the previous conduct that he had seen in his neighborhood, so he decided at that particular point that these people always get away with it and on that night he wouldn't let it happen. >> when he was referring to, you know, these people or blanking punks as he said, you don't think that was in all a reference to african-american youth? >> well, i think he saw someone that he thought was highly suspicious, someone he thought was up to something bad, that he wanted to do something about it. i think it's important, though, for purposes of where we are now, we're in a court case, bringing race into this situation does nothing but make people pick sides and invoke some prejudice into the proceedings. we don't want that. we want mr. zimmerman to have a nice, fair and just trial. >> you're sitting with trayvon martin's parents. how are they holding up? we've seen them get up a number of times when the testimony is graphic or a picture is shown. how are they holding up? >> it's very tough. so they are taking it piece by piece. i think the state is making sure they try and give us advance notice about some sensitive parts, but you had situations for example when trayvon's face was shown in some of the evidence. it was tough for tracy because that's a picture he used to identify trayvon's body and showing that picture in court invoked that. that was a sensitive moment. mom has had some issues, you know, just hearing some of the 911 tapes and the gunshot that killed your child is very tough. they are doing -- they are maintaining. they are here to see it through. they are very encouraged by what they are seeing here in court and the job the state of florida is doing to present this case. >> appreciate your time. thanks for being on. >> thank you for having me. >>> exclusively on "360" mark o'mara. he's defending george zimmerman. good to have you on. rachel jeantel has been on stand for the past two days. do you think her testimony went well for the defense? because she was really billed as the prosecution's star witness. do you think it's worked in the defense's favor? >> well, you know, i think that she was a reticent witness, i don't think she wanted to be involved and waited so long and found out by happenstance. i was most concerned not with her testimony but the way she started with mr. crump's interview, off record without law enforcement there and more problematic, the interview, she's sitting right next to trayvon martin's mother when she's supposed to give her first sworn law enforcement statement and in that statement she didn't tell the truth on a number of issues. i think she didn't want to be there. she was reluctant and i think that reluctancy showed up in her testimony today and yesterday. >> and stressing in the court todd ant the presence of trayvon martin's mother during that interview with law enforcement, to you that says what? that there's potential that either she was changing her statements to the police based on the family being present? >> well, she testified that she did. she testified that when she was talking to ben crump and the mom was there and when she was talking to mr. delirion and trayvon's mother next to her on the couch and tearing up and crying, she lightened up. you have to wonder why any law enforcement officer, particularly a prosecutor with 30 years experience would risk taking a statement from a witness in front of the deceased mother. you have to know that there will be some impact and as she testified today and yesterday. there was impact because she didn't say what she heard on the -- on the telephone. she actually went light. she sort of modified it herself, and we don't know to what extent she modified with curse words and who she wanted to blame talking in front of the mother. >> have you ever heard of police interviewing a witness or potential witness in front of the parent of the victim? >> let me think for a moment. absolutely not. it is cop 101 and prosecutor 101. you have to maintain the individual nature of a witness' testimony, make sure they are absolutely not impacted or bias by the situation that they are in. we know you can't do it, you know, with bright lights and a rubber hose. you also can't do it with sympathy parent taking a statement in front of the deceased's mother. >> you said you may have to ask her additional questions, why? >> there are certain issues that may become relevant and that's talking about trayvon's history and background. my hope from the beginning is that we don't go there and try this case simply on the seven or eight minutes that happened around his passing, however, if the state tries to present something that needs to be rebutted by sort of looking into trayvon martin's past, then this witness who knows pretty well and actually gave some fairly colorful statements as to what trayvon martin said, as far as some race and fighting may well become relevant. i hope not, but we may have to get that on the record. >> how is your client, george zimmerman, feel about how the trial is going? can you say? >> he's afraid. he is frightened. he felt he did something he has to do to protect his life and other people are trying to put him in prison because of it. he's stressed for a year and a half getting to this point and now he's dealing with the reality that he's got the state of florida trying to say that what he did to save his own life was a crime. that's a frightening position to be in. >> mark o'mara, good to have you on the program again. thank you. >> good to be here, thank you. >>> just ahead, a stunning new development. aaron hernandez currently jailed on a murder charge, now being investigated for his possible connection to a double homicide last year. and does paula deen's use of a racial slur deserve the fallout? more sponsors dropping out. she's not reached out to the reverend jesse jackson. she joins me, coming up. mine was earned in djibouti, africa. 2004. vietnam in 1972. 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[ male announcer ] but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. >>> welcome back. new developments tonight in another "crime and punishment" story we're following. former nfl tight end aaron hernandez charged yesterday as you know in the murder of a 27-year-old acquaintance is also being investigated in connection with a double homicide in boston last july. that's according to law enforcement source close to the investigation. as we reported just hours after his arrest yesterday, hernandez was dropped by his team, the new england patriots. today, puma ended its relationship with the athlete. now the hearing, new details came out about the alleged evidence prosecutors say they have uncovered. susan candiotti has the latest. >> reporter: a law enforcement source selling cnn boston police just sound a silver suv linked to the case after looking for it since last year. and believe hernandez was renting it at the time of the murders. >> following every lead and trying to establish the evidence in that case and believe we're making process. but at this moment in time, it's too premature to name any one individual as a suspect. >> reporter: lawyers won't comment on the possible connection. today, a judge rejected a second attempt by the defense team to spring hernandez from jail on the first degree murder charge in the alleged execution shooting death of oden lloyd. >> despite the fact that he has a fiance and baby and is a hem owner, he has the means to flee and a brace let wouldn't keep him here, nor would $250,000. >> reporter: during that hearing, prosecutors revealing new alleged evidence, and a condo leased by hernandez in a town near the football players' home and in a hummer outside, also said to be linked to hernandez, they seized a .45 caliber ammunition and clip, the same ammunition used to kill lloyd. in court, prosecutors called attention to a photo obtained by tmz, showing hernandez holding a .45 caliber hand gun. prosecutors are not saying that's the murder weapon, and are still looking for it. the motive is still unclear. investigators claim hernandez was angry over something the victim said at this nightclub two nights before the murder. >> there was certain things that happened during the night. >> reporter: investigators say they built their case against hernandez using cell phone tower tracking, text messages, and surveillance tapes. at hernandez's home and elsewhere. in the wee hours of june 17, hernandez allegedly picked up lloyd at his home. then joined by two other unidentified passengers. they stopped at a gas station and buy blue bubble gum. during that ride at 3:23 a.m., lloyd sends a text to his sister, reminding her of who he was with. he writes, nfl, just so you know. two minutes later, witnesses hear shots near the murder scene. about four minutes later, hernandez is seen carrying a gun, arriving home with two other people. investigators say they matched shell casings from the murder scene to one .45 caliber shell found in hernandez's rental car. after lloyd is killed -- >> the defendant appear at the rental agency where they rented the silver nissan. at that time, they go into -- to return the car, the defendant offers the attendant a piece of blue bubble gum and finds a .45 caliber casing. >> so this is fascinating. are authorities saying whether or not hernandez pulled the trigger in the murder? >> reporter: they're saying it this way, that he orchestrated the execution, and then they went on to say that he and another man delivered the fatal blows to oden lloyd as he was lying there on the ground. whether this is a matter of semantics is unclear. but either way, hernandez is charged with first degree murder. >> thank you very much. more companies are dumping paula deen after she admitted to using a racial slur years ago. the backlash has been fast and fierce but is it fair? i'll speak to the reverend jesse jackson. >>> around a grand jury indicts the boston bombing suspect. >>> more companies are dropping paula deen after she admitted using a racial slur in the past. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] if you can't stand the heat, get off the test track. get the mercedes-benz you've been burning for at the summer event, going on now at your authorized mercedes-benz dealer. hurry, before this opportunity cools off. >>> more companies are dropping paula deen after she admitted using a racial slur in the past. today, home depot and target no longer sell her products and the maker of a diabetes drug she was a spokesperson for has suspended their relationship. this comes a day after her appearance on nbc's "today" show. >> if there's anyone out there that has never said something that they wished they could take back, if you're out there, please pick up that stone and throw it so hard at my head that it kills me. please. i want to meet you. i want to meet you. i is what i is, and i'm not changing. >> the food network, walmart and sears have also dumped deen. but one thing that's not taking a hit is her book sales. preorders for her new book are so strong, it's on the top of amazon's best seller list. some of the companies that have dropped her are getting angry comments. she's hired a crisis management firm. now the question is, does the punishment fit the crime? i spoke with reverend jesse jackson and professor boyce watkins. >> reverend jackson, what did you and her talk about? >> she explained that she is not a racist. she appeared to be contrite and agonizing over the accusations. but the issue is not just the words but she must spend her time now focused on the workplace conditions, a, and the plan to have workplace conditions that pass the test. if she does that, she can be reclaimed and redeemed. >> professor watkins, we spoke the other day about her. you said in the past you were a fan of hers. i'm wondering if your opinion has changed at all just over the last couple of days. what do you make of where she is now? >> in order to really try to connect with paula and to connect with the situation, i reach to my elders. i spoke with reverend jackson and my grandmother. those perspectives allowed me to do something i can't do at my age, which is to really look at the world through the eyes of somebody who dealt with the paula deens of the world in the '50s, '60s and '70s. the best lesson that paula deen can get from all of this is to know there's a difference between liking you and respecting you. and i think that paula is a good person who wants to have a good heart. i think she has a lot of friends who are african-american, and i think in her mind she really loves these people. but the question is whether or not she truly respects african-americans as her equals. people love their pets, but they don't want their dog at the dinner table. so the issue to me is that paula can be completely redeemed. she can be forgiven. but forgiveness goes deeper than what you say. it comes down to what you do. >> reverend jackson, advanced sales of her new cookbook is number one on amazon. a lot of people have tweeted me saying the media is making too much of this. maybe she used some inappropriate language in the past, but this is much ado about nothing. to that you say what? what do those people not understand? >> it is something to do about something, but grace can detoxify sins. it's not just the words but the work place environment. she should immediately address the charges against her. she should immediately address a thorough investigation of her own internal work environment. is it fair? is it open? is it nonracial? is it gender sensitive? and they plan to make it a diverse workplace. so the contrite words, she is reclaimable if she takes immediate actions and stop trying to justify herself. >> professor watkins, is this an opportunity for people to have a discussion about race they haven't had or don't want to have? >> this is another opportunity. the reality is this, anderson. you know, when someone comes to you and they stay, what you staid offended me, that this concept, this idea that you shared, it hurts my feelings, you have a choice. you can say oh, you're crazy. or your feelings are not valid. what's wrong with you? or you can show respect and stay i don't understand why you feel this way, but why don't you help me understand and i'll help you understand how i feel. that's how you have a productive dialogue. one of the things we're running into is you have millions of people in america who have never endured work place racism, they've never endured the horrors and atrocities and terrors that people of color in this country have experienced for hundreds of years and they get to the point where they devalue that because someone wrote a great cookbook. if we want to make progress here and paula wants to redeem herself, this is the chance to have good dialogue. >> there are people who say she's just of a certain generation -- >> i would urge her right now to take ownership. the work place environment and security and free of hostility is important for workers everywhere. >> professor, for people who say she's just from a certain region and generation, she grew up a certain way, you know, she's a product of her past. >> well, i think she is. i think paula deen was made in america, just like malcolm x was made in america. he went through so much oppression in his life that he spent his whole life fighting against the racism that destroyed his family. to with paula deen, we have to realize he's a symbol, a manifestation of millions of other americans who think in the same way. they don't understand why these words can be hurtful. they don't understand this is the product of an environment, of structural racism. so wiping paula deen off the planet is not going to make america a better country. i don't want to see this woman's career destroyed. i want to see her cooking her food, which i have eaten and is very good. i want to see her living her life. but in order for that to happen, we have to do deep cleaning on racial inequality in america and not just cleanse the surface. if we don't, we're going to have the same problem 50 years from now. >> thanks for talking. appreciate it. >>> just ahead tonight, the sweeping indictment against the boston bombing suspect handed up today by a grand jury. also, president obama today made his most expensive remarks about the nsa leaker edward snowden and the lengths the u.s. will go to find him, or what. stay tuned. when we made our commitment to the gulf, bp had two big goals: help the gulf recover, and learn from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i've been with bp for 24 years. i was part of the team that helped deliver on our commitments to the gulf - and i can tell you, safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge safety equipment and technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all our drilling activity, twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. safety is a vital part of bp's commitment to america - and to the nearly 250,000 people who work with us here. we invest more in the u.s. than anywhere else in the world. over fifty-five billion dollars here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. ♪ hooking up the country whelping business run ♪ ♪ build! we're investing big to keep our country in the lead. ♪ load! we keep moving to deliver what you need. and that means growth, lots of cargo going all around the globe. cars and parts, fuel and steel, peas and rice, hey that's nice! ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? 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[ male announcer ] now get 50% off brake pads and shoes at meineke. >>> check out some of the other stories we're following. susan has the "360" bulletin. >> nbc news is reporting that retired marine general james cartwright has been notified he's under investigation for allegedly leaking information about a highly classified covert u.s. cyber attack on iran's nuclear program. cnn has not confirmed that report, and general cartwright and his lawyer have not commented on it. nor have the justice department and the u.s. attorney general. >>> in senegal, president obama made his most extensive remarks so far at nsa leaker edward snowden. he expressed secrets about snowden may spill. president obama also said he's not going to take extraordinary measures to capture the fugitive. >> no, i'm not going to be scrambling jets to get a 29-year-old hacker. >> a massachusetts grand jury returned a 30 count indictment against boston bombing suspect dzhokhar tsarnaev, charging him with using weapons of mass destruction and killing four people. 17 of those charges carry the possibility of the death penalty. >>> in new york, co-stars and fans said goodbye to actor james gandolfini. >> susan, thanks. >>> real estate agents are watching the housing market. it's one of the most powerful signs of improvement in the economy. and in some places it can't be missed. tom foreman now. >> modern luxuries combined with traditional charm. if you want to take a look, i'll show you what i mean. >> reporter: like the california summer, home prices around los angeles are heating up fast. agent eric tan says condos going for $100,000 a year ago are now fetching $160,000, $170,000 and more. >> the market has changed drastically. everything is trending upwards as far as the sales price and competition for buyers. >> reporter: he works for red fin, where until recently, the ceo was -- >> scared to death. probably how i felt a year ago. we were worried about the market. it had been many years since we had seen a rally. now this year, we feel very confident. >> reporter: confident because home prices in 20 targeted cities over the past year rose about 12%, and in some markets by even more. in atlanta, prices shot up almost 21%. in las vegas, more than 22%. and in san francisco, nearly 24%. the general slow improvement of the economy and the reemergence of investors convinced home prices have hit bottom are credited with making sellers so happy. >> on the buyers side, it's a different story. >> reporter: true enough. in some of the hottest markets, buyers, who were calling the shots just a few months ago, now find themselves in bidding wars for the most desirable properties. still, the journey to a full recovery could yet see roadblocks and it will take time. even with the upward trend, one study found the average home value now is about where it was in 2004. tom foreman, cnn, washington. >> interesting to hear. we'll be right back. all business purchases. so you can capture your receipts, and manage them online with jot, the latest app from ink. so you can spend less time doing paperwork. and more time doing paperwork. ink from chase. so you can. 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"piers morgan live" starts now. >>> this is "piers morgan live." welcome, tonight drama in the courtroom. trayvon martin's friend takes the stand for the second day. the teenage girl who has a unique way of making sir sound like an insult. >> he did not tell me that, sir, he just told me he trying to get home, sir, but the man was still following -- following him, sir. >> and the last moment of trayvon martin's life captured on a chilling 911 call. >> do you think he's yelling help? >> yes. >> there is gunshots. >>> we'll break down today's testimony d
CNN
Jun 29, 2013 8:00am PDT
. >> martin savidge, we're going to talk more about this case but from a different point of view. alicia stanley helped raise trayvon martin from the age of 3, she says, until she and trayvon's father split up 14 years later. she gave this exclusive interview to cnn's "ac 360." >> i want people to know that trayvon was a kind person. he was a loving person. he loved children, babies. you know, before this happened i really believe he had been working with children because he adored children. and just let people know that he's not what the media make him out to be. like he was this thug. he wasn't that. >> are you watching the trial? >> i am not watching the trial. my -- >> why? >> it's hard for me. i mean, to see and hear the things that led to his death, it's hard for me. and i don't care to hear it -- i don't care to hear that. i don't. >> do you have any doubt about what happened? >> i have no doubt that he didn't start that fight. he didn't start the fight. what i'm saying is that he did -- it was a fight. there's no doubt it was a fight, and zimmerman had to put his hands on
CNN
Jun 27, 2013 2:00pm PDT
or hurt the state's case? cnn's martin savidge has been inside the courtroom all day. he's joining us right now with the very latest. so what happened? >> reporter: rachel jeantel is the kind of witness that journalists love but also the kind of witness that can be both a nightmare for the prosecution and defense and she probably lived up to that reputation over these past two days. however, that said, she did seem to be different today on the stand. her responses, depending on how you weigh the "yes, sir" seemed to have a bit more respect and decorum than yesterday and she also seemed for firm in her answers when challenged. she is key as a witness. she maintains she was on the phone with trayvon martin right up to the moment that the confrontation happened between zimmerman and the teen. he said she heard trayvon say "i'm willing followed" and then she heard him say something like "what are you following me for?" and zimmerman said "what are you doing around here?" and then she said she heard the wet grass and then she heard trayvon saying "get off, get off." that's all very dama
CNN
Jul 1, 2013 2:00pm PDT
he could get in there and rub it in a little bit more and he's not doing that yet. >> let's reserve judgment on that. >> we'll reserve judgment, that's right. that's it for "the lead." i turn you over to wolf blitzer in "the situation room" who will continue the coverage of the george zimmerman trial. >> happening in his own words, jurors see and hear george zimmerman on tape recounting those dramatic chain of events that ended in trayvon martin's death. >> also, it's the deadliest blaze since the 9/11 attacks and the deadliest in arizona history. and former government george w. bush breaking his silence about the nsa leaker edward snowden in an exclusive interview with cnn. you'll see it and hear it here in "the situation room." i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." in the meantime, we're continuing our live coverage of the george zimmerman trial. mark o'meara is continuing his questioning of chris serino, one of the first police officers on the scene. >> more so than the shooting incident, correct. >> so with that in mind, let me just show you what the jury is seeing now and is already in evidence and ask you is that some of what you're talking about, the trauma of that? of course -- >> that's the trauma the night of. >> this is the picture that you saw that officer wagner had taken of him, correct? >> yes. >> you didn't see mr. zimmerman live in this condition because he had been cleaned up. >> right. >> and this photograph -- that's the one that john minolo showed. >> yes. >> i hadn't seen that. >> is that part of the trauma you were talking about he had gone through. >> sir, i think more specifically the fearing for his life trauma that he was expressing. wasn't the actual physical injuries, if i may. >> and it is that or a combination of that that led you to this thought that mr. zimmerman had sort of a flat affect about everything that had happened to him that night? >> yes, sir. >> did it come across to you, though, that he was just uncaring, that he just didn't care that he had gotten beat up and that he had to shoot somebody because of it or was it truly your thought that he was reacting to the trauma? >> i would have no -- i didn't know him prior to this. it would be included to one of my concerns, yes, however, it could be something totally different. that was one of the concerns that may have been, that he was uncaring or other things were going on. >> did in the investigation, did he -- i'm sorry, in the interview, and we're talking now about the one that happened at midnight, did he seem to be cavalier or uncaring in the way he answered your questions? >> not necessarily. >> anything in interview that you would point out to the jury where you thought he was acting cavalier? by that i mean something like "can i go home no?" or "are we done here?" or "there's a midnight movie i want to catch"? >> other than potentially making himself unavailable for a next-day follow up because he to go to class -- >> okay. let's talk about that for a minute. you asked him about doing the interview, the re-creation the next day. you asked him what time he got off and he told you i have class at 6:30. he also then told you next sentence but i can skip it? >> he may have. >> if that's what the transcript says. did it give you cause -- >> i wouldn't necessarily go there but it seemed odd he would have that on his mind based on what happened out there and what had happened out there. it struck me with being different. >> did that fall in line with him having that flat affect, of him having to shoot somebody and going through the injuries, the beating or the injuries that he said happened to him? >> among other things. >> was it also concerning to you that he just said i got to go to the work in the morning? after midnight he was still with you and yet he's planning on going to work in the morning. >> that was a little concerning. >> and again, concerning if in fact he was completely uncaring? >> uncaring, among other terms. >> but not a concern if it was just further evidence of his reaction to the trauma being just going flat on things. >> correct. i mean, hard to say. >> right. >> aside from the fact that he seemed to be acting with this flat affect, there was nothing in his words that suggested an uncaring attitude was there? >> no, there weren't. >> and investigator singleton told you he didn't know trayvon martin had passed and when he had passed they had a conversation about god and being catholic and that his put his head down and shook his head know and she finally told him that trayvon martin had passed. she told that you, right? >> i don't remember that conversation but she may have. >> okay. >> did anything at all -- and i want you to really drill into it. and i'm sorry, i know that you've heard it. i have a transcript of the interview. would that assist you as i ask you some questions about the interview. >> if you have an extra copy. i might have one myself. >> up to the state. i might. let me show it to the state first. it's not the official court reporter's transcript but it may be used to refresh your recollection. >> marked for identification defense exhibit double g. >> double i. >> double i. oh. >> i'm not going to have you go through it line by line at all but basically to use it to refresh your recollection to the extent that we need to. >> okay. >> the question is this -- and on refer to that document if you need to to refresh your recollection. was there anything in the interview with mr. zimmerman at 12:27 12:05 that was contradictory to you at that point? >> no, sir. >> for example, he said he shot once. there was only one shot fired, correct? >> correct. >> and he said his head was being hit where it was and john good told you -- >> objection. hearsay again. >> sustained. >> the witnesses had talked to you about the facts of the event. none of those facts presented by those witnesses contested mr. zimmerman's rendition of the facts, did they? >> not at that point, no, sir. >> including witnesses who were right there after the shooting had occurred that saw mr. zimmerman, correct? there was no conflict there, was there? >> no, sir. >> there was no conflict with the initial officer that came on the scene, what he told you did not conflict with what mr. zimmerman had told you, right? >> no, sir. >> one fact anywhere that was contested by a fact that you knew from the investigation? >> none that i found. >> thank you. if i might retrieve the document, your honor. and then if you would remind the jury the next time that you had contact with mr. zimmerman. >> probably over the phone prior to meeting with him on the 29th. >> okay. >> oh, i'm sorry, the next day, the walk through. >> i was going to remind you. you had contact with him the next day when he came and met with you to do the walk-through, correct? >> technically later the same day, yes, sir. >> and of course that's the video that you were here for, flight. >> yes, sir. >> so he went to work that day it seemed because he waited until you got off work, correct? >> he made our appointment. i don't know whether he went to work or not. >> okay. and he was willing to do the re-creation still, correct, as we saw on the tape in. >> yes, sir. >> any concern with doing that? >> no, he was available. >> did you notice a similar behavior, we're calling now this flat affect behavior even in the video as well? >> no, he was a little more animated. >> a bit more resolved? >> you can use that word. >> and focus on the re-creation and let me ask you to point out to the jury inconsistencies that you noticed. i'm going to ask you for two types. the first is tell me -- tell the jury significant inconsistencies in the re-creation video and what he had told you the night before. let's just start there. >> okay. my interview with him -- let me clear this up, if i may. >> certainly. >> was a brief overview of what i had and it want an extensive interview. i can attest to what the interview -- what officer singleton and the walk-through was based on what i saw, that's more fair. i kind of went there to move things along because i was kind of focused to trying to identify who the deceased was at that time. >> to what? >> trying to identify who the deceased was. >> okay. >> so the interview was kind of short but i'll try. >> you're talking about the interview at midnight? >> yes. >> i also want to you tell us of any indiscrepancies in the re-creation interview either in your interview with him at midnight or investigator or officer singleton's interview with him at 8:00 p.m. that you had available to you. so as the investigating officer, you've looked at -- i'm not going to talk about the other evidence yet, we're going to get to that in a second but just my client's statements to either officer singleton or you the night before and the differences that you noticed in the video. >> okay, sir. >> okay. that's my premise question. so tell me what are those? >> i can't think of them off hand. none that come to mind right now, no. >> okay. obviously you've had an opportunity to review all of this information well before today, correct? >> yes, i did. >> you were studying from the 27th until i think at least march 12th or thereabouts, correct? >> i've been studying it, yes. >> and that included all of the information and reviewing all of his statements and comparing them, correct? >> yes. but when you say inconsistencies, i can tell you as far as a statement saying -- >> let me premise it with this then. any situation where you have what you believe mr. zimmerman went through, both parts of that trauma and multiple interviews of him, would you expect that there were going to be some differences? >> absolutely. >> and why is that? >> because we're not robots at people. i mean, not knowing him personally, i don't think i've ever heard of somebody remembering step by step exactly how stuff occurred that they were involved in, unless you're looking from the outside looking in. >> as a matter of fact, if someone were to come to you and have the exact same story down fact for fact and word for word, sentence for sentence each time you talked to them, what would you think about that person's honesty or veracity? >> i'd -- either they're being completely honest or completely false. >> if you were to ask somebody three weeks apart and they came up with the exact same story each time, wouldn't you think they were lying every time? >> it's hard to say, i'm a professional skeptic. >> it's job security being a professional skeptic, right? >> job performance really. >> yeah. >> and so in the interview, you would expect things were going to change, correct? >> correct. >> and if they were to change in significant ways and add in brand new facts and truly chang in direction, would you note that, correct? >> yes, sir. >> because that would spo show a change in the substance of it? >> yes, sir. >> and did you notice anything to bring to the jury's attention today that caused you that concern, that spidey sense that something's going wrong with what's he's telling you? >> nothing i can articulate, no, sir. >> as a matter of fact, as we look at that video, as you looked at it, it was quite entertainment with what he had told you before, correct? >> yes, sir. >> and though it was longer and more was discussed, there was nothing in that re-creation where he moved things around or did things differently or suggested things happened in a different location, did he? >> nothing major, no, sir. >> now, let's talk about we're building up to what i call the challenge interview. i know that's next. but let's stick on this one, the you of course had some move information -- you had another day's worth of investigation, right, because you were working the case the entirety of the 27th, right? >> yes, sir. >> so you had been gathering more witness statements, and more of the law enforcement workout that was being done, correct? >> yes, sir. >> would you agree you probably had a dozen or 15 witness statements available to you on the 27th? >> approximately. >> and had reviewed all of those in planning for your next communication with mr. zimmerman? >> yes, sir. >> did what he say on the re-creation video contradict any of the witness statements that you had gotten so far by friday -- or, sorry, the 27th at 5 p.m.? >> nothing directly. >> anything at all where you could explain to the jury where you looked at it and said this piece isn't fitting? >> nothing as far as the information that he'd given us, no. >> would you agree that any of the slight inconsistencies that did exist on that video you would sort of assign as just being the way interviews go? >> perhaps, yes. >> well, anything else besides that? >> nothing that comes to mind, no. as far as something that would have triggered something more than just me continuing to talk to him. >> chris serino, the patrol officer who interviewed george zimmerman on that first night after he shot and killed trayvon martin, offering his testimony, testimony seemingly pretty good for george zimmerman and the defense. we're going to continue our coverage right after this. i want to make things more secure. 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[ male announcer ] from broadband to web hosting to mobile apps, small business solutions from at&t have the security you need to get you there. call us. we can show you how at&t solutions can help you do what you do... even better. ♪ >>> the lawyers are still having what they call a side bar with the judge at this trial, as they consult over a sensitive issue presumably. let's bring in our analyst. sunny hostin is joining us, jeffrey toobin is joining us. jeffrey, it seems this appearance by chris serino, the patrol officer to interrogated george zimmerman on the night of the killing might be helping george zimmerman. >> they ought to teach this cross-examination in law school because mark o'meara is lovingly bringing out how cooperative george zimmerman was, he acted in a manner that you would expect someone in this situation. he is stretching out the cross-examination because every answer he's getting from a detective who investigated this case is helpful to the defense. >> and, you know, sunny, as we listen to this testimony from this witness chris serino, i think jeffrey makes an excellent point. it looks like it's bolstering george zimmerman's case that not only was he cooperative but he was acting in self-defense. >> well, you know, he's on cross-examination and that's what defense attorney should be doing. he should be trying to somehow bolster his client's story. but i've got to tell you, i thought that this was a very good day for the prosecution. when you listen to the tape on direct, there were so many things that struck me as fascinating. i mean, one of the things was you have one. detectives, detective or investigator singleton saying, wait a minute, you sound like you're running. you told me you got out of the car to look for a street sign but there are only three streets in your entire neighborhood. you didn't know what street you were on? when you look at the direct, i don't know. he was a pretty powerful witness for the state. but on cross-examination, a skilled attorney like mark o'mea o'meara, yes, it should be a good cross-examination. i got to tell you, i thought he was an excellent witness for the state. maybe we're all watching a different trial. >> no, we were watching the same trial. the judge has asked the jurors to leave the courtroom momentarily. they're discussing a sensitive issue. as they do that, let's take another quick break and resume our coverage after this. angie's list members can tell you which provider is the best in town. you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare. now that we're expecting, i like the fact i can go onto angie's list and look for pediatricians. the service providers that i've found on angie's list actually have blown me away. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. congestion, for it's smog. but there are a lot of people that do ride the bus. and now that the busses are running on natural gas, they don't throw out as much pollution to the earth. so i feel good. i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment. >>> judge deborah nelson has just asked the six jurors to come back into the courtroom. they were out as they were reading some of the testimony from the transcripts to make sure that the lawyers were not going too far one way or another. she's going to ask these six jurors if they want to spend another half hour or so listening to testimony from chris serino, the patrol officer who was on the scene the day that trayvon martin was shot and killed. they want to continue this for another half an hour or do they want to resume tomorrow morning 9:00 a.m. eastern? we're going to hear from the jurors as we await the decision from the jurors if they want the questioning to continue. mark, before the break you heard sunny think it was a good day for the prosecution. a lot of others think it's a good day for the defense. >> i don't think it was a good day for the defense, i think it was a great day for the defense. you have your lead investigator, the lead detective who is saying all the things the defense lawyer wants him to do. if there's any witness you want on the state side, it your lead detective. the only way they can be won by the state is if zimmerman is giving inconsistent statements. the lead detective says all the statements are consistent. that's powerful, that's strong. they're going to go to the top of the hour. here's some more questioning from mark o'meara, the criminal defense attorney and this is chris serino, the direct from the police department who investigated zimmerman that might. >> i think you said earlier there was nothing specifically inconsistent with the statements before and ere-creation video, correct? >> no, sir. >> okay. now let's just sort of move forward into your next efforts in this regard. i'm going to then move us up pretty quickly to the next interview with mr. zimmerman. before before you got to thatneck interview with mr. >>>man, tell the jury, if you would, what other actions you were doing as the investigating officer? >> from the beginning? >> yeah. we've sort of gone through the 26th, correct that, night. and we've talked about you had a dozen or so witness statements you'd already gathered on the 27th. and that we had the interview and the re-creation interview on the 27th. so moving us from that point forward. >> other than identifying trayvon himself and as far as my timeline as far as what i was doing as it pertains to george? >> yes, sir. >> the day after, after identifying -- well, on the day of the incident, i spent several hours attempting to identify trayvon and i spent most of the night doing that actually. and after identifying him, i had to go ahead and make arrangements to get him released. the interviews that were conducted in preparation for my next interview with george had to be listened to and compared to -- with the statement that he provided us. and ultimately, not to consolidate it for you but he -- we had to essentially -- we realized that the only person that saw what happened or how it initiated was going to be george because at that point we couldn't find any other witnesses to say how it began, what was the first encounter. >> and, if i might, i want to interup t int interrupt you for just a moment and then go back. at this time did you have the emergency call? >> yes, i did. >> and you also had the 911 call where you heard the screaming, correct. >> yes, i did. >> and you're telling me now you're trying to figure out no other witnesses there who can say i saw them come together. >> we could not locate anyone who said they saw that exactly. all we had were the 911 calls and the yells in the background, statements from mr. good who actually saw, no reason not to believe him, statements that your client made that corroborated everything else and that's where we were on that last interview. i had nothing of substance to basically toss it in to confront him with as far as the interview went, other than suspicious lack of remembering the streets, how many streets he had in his neighborhood and other oddities but that would have compelled me to go ahead and keep on interviewing him, they did quite add up. it would have had to have been further. >> so then what you decided to take on, which is another useful police tactic, if you will, is what you call a challenge interview, correct? >> at this point i wasn't ready for one but yes. >> you were also under quite a deal of pressure to get this case moved forward, correct in. >> yes, i was. >> and had to move even quicker than you would otherwise have moved on this case because of some of the external pressures that we now know existed in this case? >> yes, sir. >> and it was for that reason that you may have moved a little bit quicker than would you have liked to to interview mr. zimmermzi zimmerman in this aggressive manner, correct? >> yes. >> and when i say aggressive, i mean -- if you need to take control, anything it is, they teach you how to take control, get in their face a little bit, you wake them up. >> assertiveness if properly used. >> and you use your weapon systems and how to use what to get control. and that's what you learn as a cop, right? >> yes, sir. >> and you get that from the academy and from years of experience? >> yes, sir. >> and one of those things you get from years of experience is what i call the challenge interview. i don't know if you have a different name for it but -- is that what it is? >> i don't have a name for it but that's what it -- >> that's where you t to go in and undermine an interviewees' story to them, you challenge them. we go back and forth with you're being nice and then you're not being nice and then you set them up and knock them down, correct? >> that's a technique. >> i don't mean to give up your secrets. >> not at all. >> those are technique, the purpose of which you can break somebody's story, right? >> and discover the truth, yes. >> particularly in a case where you're under a lot of pressure from the outside and don't have a lot of inconsistencies that you need to either get through to mr. zimmerman in this case and break it or not, correct? >> objection. compound question. >> did you understand what i said? >> repeat it, please. >> your intent in this case because of everything that was going on was that you wanted to get mr. zimmerman in a position where if you could break him, if you could get him to change his story in a significant way, then you can find out he's lying, right? >> correct. >> that's one of them. >> yes, sir. >> the very least what you do is try and crack that door open just a little bit, get just a stream of line coming through so you can really push through it if he's lying to you? >> yeah, i'm seeking the omission that maybe there's exaggeration or maybe -- >> or the anger that may be there that didn't show before or just the hit 'em with something that -- you might even exaggerate as a problem just to see if he bites, right? >> absolutely. >> that's a tactic, right? >> yes, sir. >> and it works, doesn't it? >> at times. >> usually. >> sometimes. >> right? i mean, that's why you do it, right? >> yes, sir. >> and this type of an -- i'm going to use a term from now on, challenge interview, are you okay with that? >> that's fine. >> this type of a challenge interview, you often have two people there, right, so you can kind of play one off against the other? >> yes, sir. >> again, that's intentional. >> yes, sir. >> particularly you would use somebody like officer singleton because she had a decent relationship with george from thatirst interview. >> yes, sir. >> so she's the perfect candidate. >> could be. >> might even help they had that little christian connection thing going on and all that? >> yes, sir. >> and again, it sounds like i'm harassing your style. >> not at all. >> i just want to make sure the jury understands that these type of techniques are used for very particular purposes within law enforcement. >> yes, sir. >> we're going to continue our coverage. they're talking about the interrogation techniques that police officer chris serino used that first night in interroga interrogating george zimmerman. we'll resume our coverage in a minute. we're cracking down on medicare fraud. the healthcare law gives us powerful tools to fight it... to investigate it... ...prosecute it... and stop criminals. our senior medicare patrol volunteers... are teaching seniors across the country... ...to stop, spot, and report fraud. you can help. guard your medicare card. don't give out your card number over the phone. call to report any suspected fraud. we're cracking down on medicare fraud. let's make medicare stronger for all of us. >>> the defense attorney, mark o'meara, continuing his questioning of chris serino, the police officer who interrogated zimmerman on that first night after shooting and killing trayvon martin. they're going through right now what is called a challenge interrogation questioning that interview. let's listen in. >> you've had challenge interviews that were much more in the person's face, correct? >> usually when i had something more than what i had. >> and i was just going to say, that's where you walk in to the guy who just, you know -- >> exactly. >> -- stole eight cars in the neighborhood and you have his fingerprints on six of them and he's just telling you he was in the library studying. >> correct. >> that challenge is you walk in the interview and go you got one last chance, you're going to prison a long, long time and or you tell me what happened. that's a really aggressive challenge interview, correct? >> yes, sir. >> you have to modify the challenge style based upon what you have to hit him with, right? >> yes. >> and in this case you didn't have a lot to hit him with, right? >> no. >> now the reason you're having him repeat everything in greater detail is to see if you can wean out any inconsistencies from him? >> or other missions. admissions, omissions. stuff he might have left out. more information. >> and as to the information in the first few pages, anything else that he added that he had not talked to you about? >> anything inconsistent? >> no, nothing major. >> then you start with, again, some of the psychological underplay with him that he's going to be and you lot of scrutiny, right? you're trying to go to bat for him, you're going to have to speak for him, right? just sort of laying that into the framework here? >> well, in this particular case he could have been considered a victim also. it's just -- it's one of those investigations where -- >> agreed. but you were dealing with a lot going on that impacted on your investigation, correct? >> regardless of what was going on, i still kept an open mind that he could be a victim. >> okay. >> and in focusing him on what you thought you might have to defend when you were saying that you'd have to speak for him and this is going to be and you lot of scrutiny, this whole question of whether you profiled him and you sort of hit him with that pretty straight out of the box, hoping for maybe a response that would give you an insight as to whether or not he profiling trayvon because trayvon was black? >> or an explanation -- more of an explanation i was seeking. >> and you asked him if he had been white if he would have reacted the same way and he said yes? >> yes. >> did that cause you any concern? >> no. >> but you wanted to see if that was something that needed to be opened p opened up. >> there were external concerns about that that needed to be asked and i did. >> and you also had a concern that you evidenced to him or challenged him on because you had an issue over whether or not his rendition of getting hit dozens of times were supported by the forensic evidence of his injuries, correct? >> in my view, yes. they were lacking. >> because he said -- i think one of you questioned him and he said i got hit 20, 25 times, right? >> i believe he said 25 to 30, yes. >> it didn't seem as though there was injuries sufficient for somebody getting hit 25 or 30 times, right? >> no, it did not. >> as you mentioned earlier, the trauma that he had been through do you believe in your investigation of him that it may have just felt like he was getting hit 25 or 30 times? >> based on personal experience it could be a panic thing more. yes, it very well could have been. >> so that in and of itself was an area that was a concern of yours, correct, but not something that suggested that he was just making that story up, did it? >> no. >> as a matter of fact, have you had a chance to look at the pictures of his injuries before they started healing when you saw him? >> yes, i did. >> those are the injuries that were taken at spd, sanford police department, that night? >> yes. >> without going through each and every one, the jury's seen them three or four times, would you agree there were numerous different bruising and injuries on both sides of his scalp? >> there were injuries. >> okay. >> however, based on the way i feel as a major crime investigator, who has seen injuries a lot worse than that, i didn't consider them life threatening. >> of course. >> and we don't need to see life threatening injuries, do we -- >> no. >> okay. we don't need to see any injuries, do we? >> no, we don't. >> yeah, he did have some. >> yes, he did. >> and he had the nose injuries we talked about and he had the laceration on the back. you saw those pictures, right? >> yes, sir. >> and you saw the bruising and swelling on both sides of his head? >> yeah. i saw imperfections, yeah. call it that, yes. >> what they call punctate bruising? >> bumps, contusions. >> and to the extent that you don't count them all here today, agree that the jury can simply look at those pictures that were available to you taken really right around the time of the first midnight interview and rely on those rather than your memory? >> yes. >> all right. so chris serino, the police officer, now suggesting that the injuries that he saw on george zimmerman that night were not in his words "life threatening." we're going to assess that and continue our live coverage right after this. humans. we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back, offering exclusive products like optional better car replacement, where if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask an insurance expert about all our benefits today, like our 24/7 support and service, because at liberty mutual insurance, we believe our customers do their best out there in the world, so we do everything we can to be there for them when they need us. plus, you could save hundreds when you switch, up to $423. call... today. liberty mutual insurance -- responsibility. what's your policy? >>> the defense attorney mark o'mara continuing his cross-examination of chris serino, the patrol officer who interrogated george zimmerman on the night of the killing of trayvon martin. let's continue our coverage. >> that was when i actually walked all the way over to my street, which was those 40, 50 feet or so, correct? >> i don't recall those responses, but i was measuring from retreat view circle to his vehicle. and i'd have to listen to it again. it just seemed excessive. there was a time -- i do think that he did say that he actually paused to pick up his flashlight or something. >> pick up -- >> his flashlight, somewhere in there. >> okay. we'll defer to the tape as to what was exactly said back and forth during this interview. another effort that he did, a significant one, was when you told him that trayvon martin would videotape a lot of what he was doing. and that you believed that this whole event may well have been on video. >> yes, sir. >> correct? >> yes, sir. >> again, a very specific challenge interrogation technique, is it not? >> yes, sir. >> when you can say, you know, there's that bank just across the street and they had just instald brand-new cameras, night cameras, color cameras, and we got real good video. and the reason for doing that is because that's truly an attempt to let this guy know, whoever it is, that you've got him, right? >> that's more of a bluff, in this one, to say that i got him, that's just to put in his mind that everything may or may not be there. >> and i apologize. i spoke about two different events. this one specific event, and then some guy across the street from a bank. let me clear that up. >> okay. >> generally speaking, you might introduce the suggested existence of video evidence in order to flush out a true story. >> yes. >> and in this particular case, that's what you were doing. >> yes, sir. >> and you had suggested to mr. zimmerman there was a really good chance that trayvon martin's phone, which you had in your possession, but it was dead, the phone was dead, and you couldn't really get it out yet, but there was a really good chance that was going to have a video of this whole event. >> yes, sir. >> and that was, in effect, to get him to -- if there was something to come clean to, that he would come clean to it. >> yes, sir. >> knowing, as you said, that if it's there and it shows something you didn't tell us about, it's going to be really bad for you. >> yes, sir. >> and that was the way you said it, right? >> yes, sir. >> and that was the reason why you said it, right? >> yes, sir. >> and that was all part of your challenge interview. >> yes, sir. >> and what did he say when you told him that? >> i believe his words were "thank god, i was hoping somebody would videotape it." >> what indication did him saying to you "thank god, i really hope somebody videotaped it," what did that indicate to you? >> in my opinion, it would have been -- >> objection. >> i apologize, your honor. >> the question was what did that indicate to him. >> correct. >> to officer serino. >> that was my question. >> okay. >> what the thinking -- i think -- >> no, the indication from that response, what did that indicate to officer serino, so overruled. >> want me to rephrase the question? >> please. >> sure. the fact that george zimmerman said to you thank go i hope somebody did videotape the event, what did that indicate to you? >> either he was telling the truth, or he was a complete pathological liar, one of the two. >> okay. now, let's look at overall, was there anything else in this case where you got the insight that he might be a pathological liar? >> no. >> as a matter of fact, everything he had told you to date had been corroborated by other evidence you were already that he was unaware of. >> correct. >> okay. so if we were to take pathological liar off the table as a possibility, just for the purpose of this next question, do you think he was telling the truth? >> yes. >> i think this is a time for a break. >> i think it is, your honor. >> ladies and gentlemen, we're going to recess for the evening before i send you off. i'm going to give you my instructions again. you're not to discuss the case amongst yourself or with anybody else. you're not to read or listen to any radio, television, or newspaper reports about the case. you're not to use any type of an electronic device to look on the internet. anything having to do with this case, people, places, things, or terminology. and finally, you're not to read or create any e-mails, text messages, twitters, tweets, or blogs or any social networking pages about the case. do i have your assurances that you will abide by these instructions? please put your note pads down on the chair and follow deputy jarvis. have a good evening. >> that's judge deborah nelson recessing this day six of the george zimmerman trial. a very, very dramatic day. and we heard a lot of testimony, especially from the police interrogator, the police investigator chris serino. let's get a quick bit of analysis. jeffrey dubin is standing by. what's your bottom line? >> if i were the prosecutor sitting there listening to that cross-examination, my blood pressure would have exploded through the top of the measuring -- however you measure blood pressure. it was excruciating to listen to from a prosecution perspective. george zimmerman was honest. he was trustworthy. he told the same story over again. i used the best investigative techniques i could. i tried to trick him. i couldn't do it. he told the truth over and over again. and this is the lead cop in the investigation. i mean, look, i don't know what the result of this trial is going to be. i don't want to overstate one witness's testimony, but this cross-examination was extremely effective. >> sonny, you disagree. tell us why. >> you know, i don't know. because at the very end when you have investigator serino saying that george zimmerman say i was hoping that someone had videotaped it, this altercation, and the response from serino was i believed he was either a serial liar -- you know, pathological liar or telling the truth, and i believed he was telling the truth, i think the fact that they ended it with that, the examination today and the jury is going back to their hotel rooms to think about that, you know, was a pretty good ending for the defense. now, again, during direct examination, i thought that the prosecution went a long way towards showing a lot of inconsistencies within his statements. but i think on cross-examination, i would agree with jeff, it was a pretty masterful cross-examination. and there's more to come tomorrow. >> certainly is. don't go too far away. jeff, don't go too far away. we've got a lot more coverage coming up. just to recap, i'm wolf blitzer in "the situation room." we're beginning with the most dramatic day yet in the george zimmerman murder trial. the jury certainly did hear and watch recordings of him telling his story to police. according to zimmerman's account of what happened, trayvon martin jumped out at him, beat him, and told him he was going to die before zimmerman pulled the trigger of his gun. martin savidge is joining us right now from outside the courthouse in sanford, florida. a dramatic day indeed. for viewers who were not watching all of this riveting testimony, update us. >> well, i think even the defense mentioned that this was probably the most difficult day that george zimmerman has had to face so far. because it was obvious that the prosecution was attempting here to use his own words, whether it with his written statements that he's made, the interviews that he's given to police, or the reenactment that he did just a day after the shooting of trayvon martin. taking all of those instances and trying to bring out the inconsistencies in the story telling, and also to try to back up their initial claim, the prosecution's, that is, that george zimmerman profiled trayvon martin as a bad person, as a suspect from the very moment he spotted him on that night, february 26th in 2012. were they effective at doing that? there were moments they were able to show that there was some interesting developments. one of the things i heard before, and thought we knew everything, was doris singleton, the sanford police officer, the first officer to take the initial statement by george zimmerman. and one of the things that shocked her -- or actually, she said she was surprised that george zimmerman seemed shocked to learn that trayvon martin had died. listen to this. >> and asked you -- >> yes. >> and he told you he was catholic? >> i don't know that he said he was catholic. he asked if i were catholic and i told him that i wasn't. so i assumed that he was catholic. >> and you told him you were christian and his response was what again? >> because in the catholic religion, it is always wrong to kill somebody. >> and your response to that? >> was that if what you're telling me is truthful, then i don't believe that that is what god means when he means to kill somebody. >> is it your opinion that if what he is telling you is true -- presuming that it was true, it was your suggestion then to comfort him in whatever he was working through? >> to let him know if he was being truthful, that he was in fear for his life, and he had to kill trayvon, that i don't believe that that was what god meant. >> okay. >> i think it was just right after that, that you had said that trayvon martin was not identified yet? >> we did not know who he was. >> and that was when you communicated that to george zimmerman, correct? >> i don't know if it was directly at that same moment, but yes. we spoke about not being able to know who the victim was. >> uh-huh. >> i made a statement. i don't know what it was in response to. it was that we hadn't yet identified the victim. >> and his response was that he didn't even realize that trayvon martin had passed, correct? >> he gave me, yeah, like a blank stare on his face and said what do you mean, you don't know the victim. i said well, we don't know who he is. and he said, he's dead? and i said to him, i mean, i thought you knew that. >> reporter: after that police officer, the lead investigator took the stand, chris serino. again, the prosecution tried to point out inconsistencies. but mark o'mara quickly came back and rebutted and said, however, there may have been different ways he told the story, but was there ever a way that he told it differently that made you suspicious of george zimmerman? and, in fact, the lead investigator said no. wolf? >> martin savidge on the scene for us in sanford. let's dig a little bit deeper right now with our legal analyst, the former federal prosecutor sonny hostin. diane diamond for "newsweek." you were watching all of this very carefully today. what was your bottom line assessment on this, day six of this trial? >> my bottom line assessment is that whatever evidence is in the pot, that the prosecution is bringing forward, the defense has been able, quite ably, i think, to turn it around to their benefit. i'm not saying the prosecutor is doing a bad job, not at all. what i'm saying is when you get the two police detectives who had the most contact with this defendant immediately after the shooting, both sort of being sympathetic to him, talking to him about god and god would forgive you if you shot someone in self-defense, and then the male detective saying, you know, i told him he was going to have problems, anxiety, we would get him psychiatric help. i got to tell you, wolf, i think that there are defense attorneys across the country slack-jawed tonight, having watched this thinking what a great job mark o'mara did. it will be taught in law schools, i'll bet you. >> did mark o'mara do a brilliant job? >> i think mark o'mara is a very skilled attorney. i think he dade great job. but again, i mean, i think you've got to look at the fact that a lot of information came in on direct examination that i thought was very helpful to the prosecution. they are going step by step by step in putting their case together. and as diane just mentioned, it's sort of a balancing act at this point. there's a lot coming out for this jury. i wouldn't go so far as to say the prosecution had a bad day. but again, mark o'mara is a very skilled defense attorney, and i think he did a good job today. >> in effect, we did hear george zimmerman. maybe you could even say testified, becau
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Jun 28, 2013 10:00pm PDT
that was there when he was sick. >> we'll hear more from her shortly. first, martin savidge. >> reporter: what jonathan good saw the night trayvon martin died goes to the heart of the zimmerman case. >> that night that you saw the person who you now know to be trayvon martin was on top, correct? >> correct. >> and he was the one who was raining blows down on the person on the bottom, george zimmerman, right? >> that's what it looked like. >> reporter: good lives in the subdivision where the shooting took place. he was watching from his patio about 15 to 20 feet away. zimmerman that night was wearing a red and blackjack et. market, a dark hooded sweatshirt. >> the color of clothing on top what did you see? >> it was dark. >> the color of clothing on the bottom? >> it was a light white or red color. >> reporter: he witnessed physical blows being thrown and then mixed martial arts. >> what you saw was the person on top in an mma straddle style position, correct? >> correct. >> that was further described as being ground and pound? >> correct. >> reporter: good also testified about one more k
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Jun 26, 2013 11:00pm PDT
would rather not hear it, now is the time to turn down the volume. details from martin savidge. >> reporter: her name is rachel jentel and she's the girl trayvon martin was talking to on the phone the night he and george zimmerman crossed paths. on the witness stand trayvon told her he was being followed. >> he said he looked like a creepy [ bleep ] cracker. >> reporter: he shaerd zimmerman approach and confront martin. >> i said trayvon? and then he said why are you following me for? and then i heard a hard breathe man come and say what you doing around here? >> reporter: moments later she said she heard a struggle and describes zimmerman as the attacker. >> i kind of heard trayvon saying get off, get off. >> then what did you hear? >> then suddenly the phone hung up. >> reporter: her testimony flies in the face of zimmerman's claim of self-defense which is why her cross examination was crucial. >> good afternoon jeantel. >> reporter: they went after her credibility, specifically a claim with authorities why she didn't go to trayvon's funeral. she originally said she was in the hospital bu
CNN
Jun 26, 2013 5:00pm PDT
is the time to turn down the volume. details from martin savidge. >> reporter: her name is rachel jentel and she's the girl trayvon martin was talking to on the phone the night he and george zimmerman crossed paths. on the witness stand trayvon told her he was being followed. >> he said he looked like a creepy [ bleep ] cracker. >> reporter: he shaerd zimmerman approach and confront martin. >> i said trayvon? and then he said why are you following me for? and then i heard a hard breathe man come and say what you doing around here? >> reporter: moments later she said she heard a struggle and describings zimmerman as the attacker. >> i kind of heard trayvon saying get off, get off. >> then what did you hear? >> then suddenly the phone hung up. >> reporter: her testimony flies in the face of zimmerman's claim of self-defense which is why her cross examination was crucial. >> good afternoon jeantel. >> reporter: they went after her credibility, specifically a claim with authorities why she didn't go to trayvon's funeral. she originally said she was in the hospital but that was a lie.
CNN
Jun 27, 2013 9:00pm PDT
hearing. >> martin savidge, another gripping day in court. thank you very much indeed. i'll bring in natalee jackson, she's an attorney for trayvon martin's family. natalee, welcome back to the show. >> thanks for having me. >> fascinating day and really about this young lady rachel. you know her better than i do and most people. tell me about her. what kind of woman is she? >> well, actually, i've only met her once but i'll tell you this is a person that did not want to testify. she didn't want to talk to sybrina fulton about this case, and she certainly didn't want to talk to police officers about this case. i think we have to put her into context, piers. she's 19 years old. she heard her friend die. she heard the last moments of her friend's life and didn't find out about it until later that he died from that phone conversation. since then, this is a national spotlight case, so everyone in the world is criticizing her testimony that's been all over the internet, her interview, the way she speaks, the way they thought she looked because they thought she was someone else. it not eas
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